411 on IoT Sensors

October 17, 2019 at 8:00 AM

 

In this blog, we’ve talked about a lot of different aspects and parts of the Internet of Things (IoT) - from industrial IoT to antennas & IoT, and how the IoT is making the world safer, we’ve covered a lot of ground. Now, we’re going to take a look at IoT sensors. Along with all the “things” connected through the IoT, sensors can be enabled to collect information about the surrounding environment. Here is the info you need to know. 

 

IoT sensors capture data and deliver it to be stored and processed in the core network. They are offered in various sizes to best fit the application and can be designed to be discreet stand-alone products or integrate into another product. These sensors can be installed close to the point of use or at the edge of the network. Sometimes they are localized within a space, such as a building. Other times, they are a further distance away, like in a field. No matter the location, sensors in harsh environments must always be protected to maintain reliability and durability. The actual application will determine where the sensors are placed, as well as what type of sensor is used, how it sends back data and what data is collected.

 

Sensors are offered in mechanical, electrical, electromechanical, magnetic, electromagnetic, chemical or optical models. The type of data they collect is just as varied and which one you use depends on what your application requires. Data types include, but are not limited to: pressure, moisture, temperature, vibration, motion, chemicals, sound and speed. For precision data, the sensor will need higher accuracy. Geospatial tagging is required to collect data on location. And data that is time sensitive or mission critical might call for time tagging capabilities.

 

How often sensors capture data and when it gets sent back to the core network can also be adjusted depending on the application. Data can be collected as needed, during certain events, at predetermined intervals or continuously. That data can then be transmitted back (over a cable or wirelessly) as soon as it’s captured or only at specific times.

 

IoT sensors can be powered by an electric wire, solar power or batteries. The location of the sensors, how many are deployed and the amount of power used will largely determine the best power type for the application. It wouldn’t be feasible to change hundreds of batteries for sensors in a remote location. Just keep in mind that the more often the sensors send data, and the larger the files, the more power they’ll use.

 

There are a lot of variables to consider when choosing the right IoT sensor for your application, and now you should be well-versed in what to keep in mind.

 

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