M12 Connector Coding Demystified

May 30, 2019 at 8:00 AM

 

When you need to ensure that you have a reliable connection, even in the harshest conditions, you need an M12 connector. These rugged connectors are ideal for maintaining connections in the world of industrial automation and in any application where the environment or conditions can be a challenge. But do you know how to interpret the coding of an M12 connector? If not, you’re in luck, we’re here to help.

 

First, let’s take a look at the structure of an M12 connector. These circular connectors have a 12 mm locking thread that is typically IP-rated and provides protection from liquids and solids. Inside, there are pins in configurations of either 3, 4, 5, 8 or 12.

 

Different pin configurations are used for different applications. For example, 3 and 4-pin versions are used for sensors and in power applications, 4 and 8-pin models are used in Ethernet and PROFINET and 12-pin models are usually used for signal applications.

 

In addition to the varying pin configurations, M12 connectors are also coded. This coding prevents improper mating.

 

Here is a list of M12 codes and the applications they’re used in:

 

A-coded: sensors, DC power and 1 Gigabit Ethernet

B-coded: PROFIBUS

C-coded: AC power

D-coded: 100 Mbit Ethernet

K-coded: AC power

L-coded: PROFINET DC power

X-coded: 10 Gigabit Ethernet

S-coded: AC power (will be replacing C-coded power parts)

T-coded: DC power (will be replacing A-coded power parts)

 

Codes A, B, D and X are the most popular. A, B and D codes originated with the first M12 connectors, so they’ve been available the longest. The growth of the high-speed industrial Ethernet market has brought a surge of popularity for X-coded connectors, which are likely to eventually replace A, B and D codes in Ethernet applications.

 

There you have it, M12 codes de-coded. For all of your M12 connector needs, check out our website.

 

USB Active Optical Cables (AOC)

May 16, 2019 at 8:00 AM

 

USB has long been proven to be a dependable, flexible and simple-to-use interface that is a staple for a multitude of applications. Along the way, USB has adapted to offer a variety of formats to fit today’s technology needs. From power delivery to SuperSpeed USB 3.1 Gen 1 and Gen 2, USB has got you covered. Now the interface is taking things to another level with the introduction of USB 3.0 Active Optical Cables (AOC).

 

Active Optical Cable technology uses the same electrical inputs as traditional copper cabling, but with optical fiber between connectors. With electrical-to-optical conversion on the cable ends, AOC provides faster speeds and distance performance while also maintaining compatibility with standard electrical interfaces. Building upon the features of AOC, USB 3.0 AOC is made to be compliant with SuperSpeed USB electrical specifications, allowing for easy plug-and-play use and continuous operation between existing USB 3.0 hosts, hubs and devices.

 

These USB cables have an ultra-thin profile and much longer reach than a standard USB cable. In fact, they can reach speeds of 2.2 Gbps at over 100 meters. This allows for USB 3.0 AOC cables to be used in new and different ways USB might not have been able to before, such as with security cameras, industrial and medical machine control systems and in high-def surveillance applications. These cables are capable of speeds up to 5 Gbps, depending on the length of the cable. They also boast low power consumption and minimal EMI/RFI since fiber optic technology is being used.

 

Though USB 3.0 AOC is not backwards compatible, it won’t support older USB standards, there are many other features that make it worthwhile. Overall, USB 3.0 Active Optical Cables can be a great option if you have an application requiring USB connectivity over a long distance that traditional USB cables cannot meet.

 

To help you with your next high-speed, long distance USB application, check out our USB 3.0 AOC cables

 

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12G-SDI Serial Digital Interface

April 18, 2019 at 8:00 AM

 

Serial Digital Interface (SDI) is a digital video interface that provides a range of advantages for transmitting video and audio. This long-lived standard has been around nearly 30 years and is still as relevant as ever, keeping up with the changing demands of today’s technology. Now, SDI has come out with its most powerful iteration: 12G-SDI. Let’s take a look at all of the details.

 

12G-SDI brings the SDI standard to the next level with improved resolution, frame rate and color over a single cable. Capable of 12 Gbps speeds, it delivers four times the bandwidth of HD and is perfectly suited for the 4K 60p format. This makes it ideal for live broadcasting, studio sets and venues where it’s important for a cable to maintain a strong signal while also being easy to connect and fairly lightweight. 12G-SDI is also expected to expand into fiber to increase its distance and bandwidth capabilities up to 10km and open up opportunities for 12G technology throughout broadcast and production facilities.

 

Though this standard has been under development since 2012, it has not yet been ratified by the governing body of standards, the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE). Thus, not all manufacturers have begun making products to support 12G-SDI. But those that are being made are delivering customers with cables and connectors that are simple to connect with better image and signal, and without extra weight or cost. Even without ratification, 12G-SDI is a viable standard offering real solutions for today’s video and audio demands.

 

Category 7 Overview

April 4, 2019 at 8:00 AM

 

In today’s world, the need to transfer vast amounts of data at high speeds is required. In many Enterprise datacenters, fiber is sometimes used to handle this task but the price of expensive optics and other factors might require a copper based solution.

 

Enter Category 7 cables!

 

Category 7’s most notable quality is its capability of handle speeds of up to 10 Gbps over 100 meters, especially when compared to Cat6 and Cat5e’s 1 Gbps speeds over the same distance. During testing, speeds of up to 40 Gbps have been measured over a distance of 50 meters, and up to 100 Gbps over 15 meters. And, Cat7 cables are able to deliver those high speeds at a higher frequency of 600 MHz, as opposed to Cat6a’s max frequency of 500 MHz. This means that a Cat7 cable will be able to transfer data faster than any of the previous category cables, making it an ideal option for wiring smart homes, data centers, large enterprise networks or anywhere else a high-speed wired connection is required.

 

Aside from speed, Cat7’s other benefits of note include the extensive shielding of its twisted pairs which can considerably reduce signal attenuation and improve noise resistance. The individual pairs in these cables are shielded with an additional layer of shielding over the whole cable.

 

Cat7 cables are also extremely durable and generally have a longer lifespan that Cat5 and Cat6 cables. And while Cat7 cables can be more expensive than other category cables, that price can be offset by their increased performance and resilience.

 

Cat7 has a good amount of admirable qualities and with it being backward compatible with traditional Cat5 and Cat6 cables, Category 7 might be the right choice for your next wired installation. If your application is outdoors or in an industrial environment, check out our new rugged, Cat7 cables with 10 Gig rating. 

 

802.3cg 10 Mbit/s Single Twisted Pair Ethernet

March 7, 2019 at 8:00 AM

 

Ethernet technologies are continuing to grow and their use continues to expand across a growing number of industries. With all of this Ethernet expansion, there has been a call to quickly identify and address the progression of standards to support wider use of the IEEE 802.3 Ethernet standard. That need has brought about the development of 802.3cg.

 

The goal of 802.3cg is to deliver 10 Mb/s speeds over single twisted pair Ethernet, up to 1 kilometer. 802.3cg also specifies one or more power distribution channels delivering 13 watts of power over twisted pair link segments, not to exceed 1 kilometer.

 

This single pair Ethernet standard is aimed to provide a comprehensive communication protocol, a shared networking infrastructure, and produce power for the growing sensor technologies that will enhance the effortlessness of Ethernet’s money saving, plug-and-play design. This standard will also focus on gaps in the existing IEEE 802.3 standards and look to fill them, and it will work to build a focused, industry-approved plan for developing proposed standards. Additionally, the IEEE 802.3cg working group will determine what Ethernet standards need to be developed in order to support the wide range of products now depending on Ethernet.

 

Defining Ethernet standard requirements will extend Ethernet’s reach and there are several industries that could see significant growth. These include the automotive industry that is already using Ethernet for vehicle cameras, security systems and diagnostics, and is moving towards driverless technology that is Ethernet dependent as well. Plus, smart city technology that is becoming more popular throughout the world utilizes Ethernet, and that trend towards sustainable, connected living is expected to continue to grow. And, of course, the data centers that we all depend on to keep us connected depend heavily on Ethernet connections. In turn, Ethernet has the opportunity to innovate the data centers with the development of the 802.3cg standard and beyond.

 

The 802.3cg standard’s ability to provide 10 Mb/s speeds over single twisted pair Ethernet is a welcomed progression in the evolution of Ethernet and another sign that Ethernet has no intention of slowing down.

 

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