Wireless LOS Terminology

November 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM

Why Line of Sight (LOS) is so important

 

Sample of LOS and Fresnel Zone Diagram

When designing an outdoor wireless network, ask yourself this: what is between point A (antenna 1) and point B (antenna 2)? This path between two antennas is referred to as the Line of Sight (LOS).

 

There are three main categories of Line of Sight. Full Line of Sight (LOS) is where no obstacles reside between the two antennas. Near Line of Sight (nLOS) includes partial obstructions such as tree tops between the two antennas. Lastly, Non Line of Sight (NLOS) is where full obstructions exist between the two antennas.

 

By determining the specific Line of Sight conditions in the WiFi network area you can then determine the correct type of wireless system to install.

 

Another common term to be aware of is The Fresnel Zone, referenced in the diagram above. It is is an electromagnetic phenomenon where light waves or radio signals get diffracted or bent from solid objects near their path. The radio waves reflecting off the objects may arrive out of phase with the signals that traveled directly to the receiving antenna, thus reducing the power of the received signal.

 

Line of Site (LOS) Overview Diagram

Print and post the above diagram.

 

For indoor wireless network installations it is important to consider obstacles such as walls, ceilings, and furniture that will affect Line of Sight since these all play a role in wireless signal reception. In wireless transmissions, reflections (when wireless signals "bounce" off objects) and multipath (when wireless signals travel in multiple paths arriving at the receiver at different times) are as important as signal strength in determining the success of an installation. A signal will also exhibit peaks and nulls in its amplitude and alteration of its polarization (vertical or horizontal) when propagating through walls, ceilings and reflecting off metallic objects. 

 

Path Loss is another area of concern when dealing with Line of Sight. For instance, although 2.4 GHz signals pass rather well through walls, passing through trees and leaves is a challenge. This is due to the difference of water content in each. Radio waves in the 2.4 GHz band absorb into water very easily, so the high level of moisture in trees or leaves would trap the waves. When faced with nLOS or NLOS conditions due to trees, 900 MHz is your best choice as it is not absorbed like 2.4 GHz.

 

 

Click here to shop L-com’s Hyperlink brand wireless products.

  

Understanding Copper/Fiber Media Converters

August 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM

What is a Media Converter?

 

Diagram of fiber optic premise wiring converted to copper with media converters

A media converter is used to extend Cat 5e/6 Ethernet cabling to distances beyond the 100 meter maximum for Ethernet by converting IP voice/video/data signals to fiber optic cabling.

 

Where are Media Converters used?

 

Media converters are used in environments where EMI/RFI is present, such as manufacturing facilities and other industrial environments. Other applications include campus networks where many buildings need to be connected via fiber. Also, high-rise buildings typically use a fiber backbone, which is laid vertically and taps into copper (UTP) networks on each floor via a media converter.

 

L-com's Media Converter offering

 

L-com offers media converters designed for both commercial and industrial use.

 

Commercial-grade fiber-to-copper media converters from L-com

 

L-com Ethernet Media Converter 10/100TX to 100FX MM SC 2km

- Plug-and-play installation
- Rugged metal case ensure longevity
- Multimode and Single-mode versions available
- Easy-to-read LEDs provide at-a-glance system status information
- Operating temp: 0°C to +70°C 

 

Industrial DIN Rail Media Converters from L-com

 

LCMC Media Converters

- 35mm DIN rail mounting
- Rugged aluminum case
- 24V DC power input
- Plug and play
- Operating temp: -40°C to +70°C

 

What Does MIMO Mean?

August 7, 2013 at 10:00 AM

Multiple-in/Multiple-out Antennas (MIMO) Explained

 

MIMO Panel Antenna Showing Multiple Coaxial Lines

Most antennas have worked very simply: a frequency transmitted from one antenna could be picked up by a antenna tuned to receive it a distance away without the need of cables between them. While this basic description of a wireless system works, today we have many ways to improve upon the basic concept to increase things like redundancy and coverage. One of those methods is MIMO, which stands for multiple-in multiple-out.

 

MIMO antennas are actually several antennas all within a single physical item or radome. They co-exist either by working in different bands (as the IEEE standard 802.11n works, in both 2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz) or different polarities, or both. By breaking the data into separate signals and broadcasting them over multiple antennas, MIMO systems can pick from the strongest signal no matter what the environmental conditions.

 

If you have a radio, access point, router or other wireless device that uses MIMO transmission, you will usually see separate jacks for the different signals. Likewise, a MIMO antenna will have multiple jacks or cables to hook up. Once they are plugged in, the antenna takes advantage of a phenomenon called "multipath", which refers to the way multiple signals bounce off of objects and arrive at the receiver at slightly different times.

 

Quick note: L-com's HyperLink® MIMO antenna product center includes options for many popular bands and antenna types.

Tutorial on Coaxial Cabling

July 3, 2013 at 10:00 AM

 

 

 

Coax is one of the most venerable cabling standards having been developed for the US military over 50 years ago. Unlike some standards that were popular for a while and eventually became legacy, coaxial cabling is still very relevant and used in a lot of common applications. It is a robust and reliable cable type with no sign of going away any time soon.

 

 

 Types of Coax Cabling

 

As you can imagine, over the years that coax has been around, many variations have been designed for specific applications. We will talk about the Radio Guide (RG) styles and the low-loss styles that were made popular by Times Microwave's LMR® standard. Though there are many other coax options like mini coax, twinaxial and tri-axial, the applications for those have dwindled in recent years.

 

 

RG-style Coaxial Cable

 

The original Radio Guide standard called for a number followed by codes to determine specific aspects of the cable (such as jacket type, center conductor material, etc.). However, today many of the standards have become "soft" meaning that RG58B/U, for instance, may have very different characteristics from manufacturer to manufacturer.

 

Exposed view of a coaxial cable

Most RG numbers refer to cables made with specific diameters (as thicker diameters typically have lower attenuation over long lengths), shielding, jacket type, and dielectric type. The dielectric is important as it can control the "characteristic impedance" of the cable. In general, cables with a characteristic impedance of 50 Ohms are used in data and wireless network applications, and cables with a characteristic impedance of 75 Ohms are used in higher bandwidth audio/video applications.

 

The bottom line about RG-style coax cable: if you need to get a specific type for your application, you should include the characteristics of the cable with your request. The actual standard may have some variations that would make the off-the-shelf product unsuitable for some circumstances.

 

 

Low-loss Coaxial Cable

 

Low-loss cable is almost exclusively used in wireless applications. It is ideal for any antenna-to-radio setup, and is often used extensively in wireless system installations. Low loss cable is often referred to by its series number, such as 200-Series cable, which is usually a rough approximation of the diameter of the cable. The higher the number (ie, 400, 800, etc), the thicker and heavier the cable, and the less attenuation over the length. Because of this, higher series numbers are typically used in cases where the antenna is permanently installed at some distance from the radio. Lower series numbers are used in cases where the antenna is closer, especially in portable setups where the weight of the cable is important.

 

 

Connectors

 

There are a large variety of coaxial connectors, usually designated by a letter or combination of letters. Most coaxial connectors are round or hex shaped, and can come in screw-on, push-on, or twist-lock designs. Be extra careful if you need a connector that is called "reverse polarized" or preceded with the letters "RP". These connectors are similar to the regular polarity versions except that the gender of the connector is reversed, making it unable to mate unless it is with another RP style connector. For a complete list of coaxial connectors with large images, try this coaxial connector chart.

 
If you are in need of coax: L-com has carried RG style coax cable and assemblies for decades, and together with our vast collection of low-loss coax cables it is one of the most comprehensive in the industry.
 

DB9 D-Subminiature Connectors : Advantages and Disadvantages

June 19, 2013 at 10:00 AM

9-pin D-Sub connectors (DB9 or DE-9)

 

DB9 Connector on Cable

For many years, serial communication was one of the chief methods of connecting peripherals (such as joysticks, printers, and scanners) to PCs. The most common connector type for serial communication was the 9-pin D-Subminiature connector, or sometimes called a DB9 or a DE-9.

 

Nine pins were plenty to carry the data in series, and though there were many drawbacks to DB9 connectors which eventually lead to them becoming legacy in favor of standards like USB, there are still many devices with DB9 ports or cables on them today.

 

 

What are the disadvantages?

 

The connectors themselves are large, making them difficult to connect and disconnect in tight spaces. Also, the pins are exposed in the shell, so they can be easily bent or broken off. Though the connector can be mated without using the thumbscrew hardware, it does not tend to hold as well using just friction-fitting. If you do use the thumbscrews, the connector takes much longer to plug in and unplug.

 

Finally, serial communication tends to be slow, especially over longer lengths, and unexpected breaks in communication could cause software on the PC to freeze. All of these problems led to other standards becoming more popular for the same applications.

 

However, this does not mean that the DB9 connector is a lost cause. There are actually solutions available for many of the problems mentioned above. For instance, right angle adapters solve the tight-space problem by allowing a tight angle without damaging the connector. Widely available D-Subminiature plug and jack covers can protect pins from damage when not mated, and adapters like gender changers and socket savers can reduce the stress caused by repeated mating cycles.

 

 

On the other hand...

 

ES4-232 4-Port Ethernet to DB9 Adapter and Device Server

DB9 connectors have advantages too. In general they are far easier to customize, with at least 9 individual pins to carry serial data. Though the speed is slower than other standards, the length of the cable can be much longer. USB, for instance, has a five-meter length limit, but RS-232 (the most common standard for serial data) has no defined length limit, and RS-422 has been used at lengths hundreds of meters long with special equipment.

 

Also- Don't worry if you have an old device that only has DB9 connectors on it. Even with D-Subminiature being mostly legacy, there are plenty of options for conversion. Converters to and from USB, Ethernet, and other standards are common and can allow you to use your device on any computer today.

 

Examples of Applications for Serial Converters

If you're looking to find DB9 Connectors: L-com carries products ranging from economical serial cables with many off-the-shelf lengths to high-quality premium cables for demanding applications. Also check out L-com's D-Subminiature adapters for innovative solutions to common problems, and L-com's bulk cable, connectors, adapter kits and tools for do-it-yourself components.
 
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