Case Study: Sony Biotechnology

June 28, 2018 at 8:00 AM

 

Sony Biotechnology is an award winning, state-of-the-art medical manufacturing company that has delivered innovative, high-quality product solutions to the global market for 23 years. Their main focus is the flow cytometry market, designing and building equipment that sorts human and animal cells.

 

One of Sony Biotechnology’s new products needed a high-quality, shielded Ethernet cable that could meet Sony’s design requirements. The cable needed to have stranded conductors, color coded conductors, a tinned copper braided shield that could be soldered to and a low-smoke zero-halogen jacket to meet environmental and safety standards. This design-specific cable also had to meet project deadline and cost constraints.

 

Sony purchased cable from another manufacturer, but they ran into several issues that made the cable unusable. For example, during testing, the cable would not hold the solder to attach to the grounding wire. Plus, the individual conductors were not color coded, which made termination very challenging and time consuming. After asking for the supplier’s cable specs, it was also discovered the cable’s braided shield had been made with aluminum instead of tinned copper.

 

Since this manufacturer’s cable failed Sony’s testing and requirements, Sony consulted with L-com’s product management team to find a solution. Our product team was able to provide them with an off-the-shelf solution that met all of Sony’s needs, the TRD855DSZ-7 Ethernet cable. This double-shielded, 26 AWG cable with a LSZH jacket not only met all of Sony’s requirements, but it was available immediately and met Sony’s price target.

 

 

To read the entire case study click here.

 

5 Things You Need to Know About Shielded Ethernet Cables

August 18, 2016 at 8:00 AM

 

Shielded Ethernet cables are widely used, so you may know what they are. You may even be familiar with some of the advantages and disadvantages of using them. But if you want to dig a little deeper into the world of shielded Ethernet cables, here are 5 things you need to know.

 

1. A single-shielded Ethernet cable has the lightest available shield but still weighs 12% more on average than an unshielded cable. A double-shielded Ethernet cable weighs as much as 30% more than the unshielded version. This additional weight may not be a big deal if you are only running a few shorter cables, but if your network is using dozens or hundreds of shielded cables, the combined weight could be enough to damage a rack, cable ladder or other cable management infrastructure. 

 

2. Double-shielded cables  have both a foil and braid shield and can better protect data from EMI/RFI and alien crosstalk (AXT). This protection results in higher transmission speeds and fewer data transmission errors.

 

 

3. High-flex industrial cables are shielded and built for continuous or high-flex applications, and also employ special jacket materials to solve common industrial Ethernet problems. They are designed for environments where ordinary patch cables fail. These cables will not breakdown when exposed to oil based lubricants, making them ideal for robotic control systems on the factory floor.

 

4. Shielded IP67-rated and IP68-rated Ethernet cables use a hood around the male connector that can screw onto the barrel of a female jack for protection against moisture and dust. Shielding the cables and connectors ensures better performance and higher data transmission rates.  IP67 and IP68-rated cables are also protected from liquid immersion, giving them another layer of protection.

 

5. Shielded Ethernet cables provide maximum performance even in high EMI/RFI environments.   Category 6 shielded cables are designed to handle today's hi-speed Gigabit Ethernet applications. Category 6a cable assemblies offer true 10 Gigabit Ethernet speeds at frequencies up to 500 MHz, making them ideal for high speed computing applications often found in data centers. Both Cat6 and Cat6a shielded cables are designed to outperform with super speeds and shielding protecting your data from interference.

 

Video Blog: How to Make Your Own Shielded Ethernet Cable

May 19, 2016 at 8:00 AM

 

If your application requires extra protection from electromagnetic or radio interference, shielded cable may be the perfect solution.  When installing cabling or network devices in close proximity to machines, motors, power cables, fluorescent lights or other electronics that produce high electromagnetic or radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI), shielding will protect the data from EMI/RFI, increase transmission speeds and reduce data transmission errors.  A shielded Ethernet cable also protects from alien cross talk (AXT), caused by other cables and nearby connected devices.

 

If you do require shielded Ethernet cables you can either buy pre-assembled cables or you can build your own. We have created a helpful video to assist you if you decide to go the DIY route.

 

Our instructional video demonstrates an easy life hack to make your own shielded Ethernet cable. With just 4 items and 3 short minutes, our simple steps will show you how to build your own shielded Ethernet cable. Go ahead, bring out your inner MacGyver – you know you want to.

 

For more information on shielded cables, read our blog Who Needs Shielded Cables Anyway.

 


Shielded Ethernet Cable: Advantages and Disadvantages

November 18, 2013 at 9:08 AM

 

 

Cat5e Shielded Ethernet Cable- 26 AWG Stranded PVC Industrial Ethernet Patch Cords - Blue

Shielding Ethernet Data from EMI/RFI

 

The typical Ethernet cable has four twisted pairs terminated to the eight pins in the clipped "RJ-45" (also, more correctly known as 8p x 8c connector) at either end. The cable used is commonly called "UTP", which stands for unshielded twisted-pair.

  

If there is an unshielded version, there must also be a shielded version right? That is correct. Today we'll look at STP, or shielded twisted-pair

 


The Shielding Disadvantages

 

Shielding is not an automatic choice for every installation. Why? Because although shielding provides the protection that may be necessary for some environments, it also comes with some serious disadvantages.

Shielded Ethernet Cable

 

The first is weight. A single-shielded Ethernet cable weighs on average about 12% more than an unshielded cable, and a double-shielded Ethernet cable weighs as much as 30% more. That doesn't mean much when you have a single 4oz cable. But what if your building has dozens or maybe hundreds of individual STP cables that run on ladders over a ceiling, under a floor, or behind walls? The combined weight from these cables could be such that they actually damage the rack. 

 

The second disadvantage is flexibility. In permanent installs, this isn't so much of an issue, though you must be careful when pulling the cable through conduit. But in applications where the cable is attached to something moving, like a robotic arm, a swiveling camera, or tools used by manufacturing personnel, the shield can be a problem. A single foil shield can break and the sharp edges of the cut in the shield would grind against the insulation of the individual wires, eventually cutting into it and shorting it out. Your best bet is to get tight-extruded cables rated for continuous flexing to ensure the maximum lifespan over repeated cycling.

 

Shielding Options

 

There are several options available if you need a shielded cable for your Ethernet application:

 

 

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