How Secure is Your Datacenter?

May 22, 2014 at 10:00 AM

 

Let’s hope your data center isn’t this vulnerable.

 

If its security system is still in a diaper phase you could be in a lot of trouble, and most likely at risk of a security breach...

 

Why, you might ask, are we talking about babies and computers?

 

Because data centers are the nerve center of an organization. This means that security should be top priority, and your data center security should be as impenetrable as a fully grown, seven-foot bearded lumberjack.

 

And surely it’s not probable that a baby could hack into your data center, but the point is to assess who or what could interfere with the security of your data.

 

In a study done by the 2013 IBM Cyber Security Intelligence Index that encompassed 3,700 clients across 130 countries, it was estimated that the average number of cyber attacks on a single organization over the course of a week is 1,400. That’s two hundred per day!

 

The 2014 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) also examined another 50 organizations and found that a collective 63,000 “security incidents”  occurred as well as 1,367 actual data breaches.

 

One security breach that happened recently at Iowa State University left about 30,000 students exposed. And we all remember what happened at Target; it was the largest retail breach in U.S history. Yikes.

 

 

Check it once, check it twice

 

 

Next-generation data centers will require ever-evolving solutions to keep sensitive business and client information secure, and this is the reality that businesses will have to face as they grow and build upon their server infrastructure.

 

But it doesn’t have to be a huge daunting task. There are different levels of security we can all utilize in order for our datacenters to have a robust security system.

 

Here are 3 different levels of security with examples to help you prepare in securing your datacenter:

 

Physical security: locked entry-way doors with HID key access only, retina scan or fingerprint entry, locking IT closets, security cameras, motion sensors, etc.

 

Software security: firewall protection, data encryption, implementing VLANs, using IP routing and access control lists, web filtering and security, malware protection.

 

Employee security:  First assess, who should have access to what? Set permissions, clear sensitive information from desks, monitor entries and requests for important material, and check your wireless network security- do you have CPE’s (access points) in place with high levels of data encryption for transferring info wirelessly?

 

IT managers and facility operations can also schedule routine audits to help find any type of security infiltration.

 

At L-com we carry a variety of products and technologies that support security and could be helpful with your system implementation:

 

  • ·         IP cameras: These can be used in a variety of areas including data closets, server rooms, warehouses, hallways, etc.
  • ·         Fiber optic cable: Since fiber transfers data with light this makes it very hard to tap and steal data.
  • ·         Physical Layer Isolation: Isolate and protect data by placing a physical barrier between your computer or other device and the network cables that are attached to it.
  • ·         Ethernet Switches that use VLANS:  Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) can be used to isolated select users to specified servers, routers and other network devices limiting access to sensitive information.
  • ·         Middle Atlantic cabinets and our NEMA enclosures are lockable for rugged protection.

 

By assessing and maximizing your security systems you can find peace of mind that your critical information is secure and protected at all times, with zero threat of unauthorized access or infiltration.

 

None of us want to be hacked. We don’t want to go down in history like any of these guys (20 infamous hacker break-ins).

 

So take precaution. Review your current security systems and ask yourself, how secure is my data center?

 

How We’re Launching into the Future of Fiber & Wireless Technologies

May 1, 2014 at 10:00 AM

 

Picture this:

 

You’ve consistently worked hard on keeping up with the latest technologies and standards so that you can be the best in your business.

 

You’re confident in your knowledge and technique.

 

Then you get the call that you’re in. They want you.

 

And you have the opportunity to present this knowledge in front of some really important people……

 

That’s how we feel this month!

 

We’re honored to announce that we’ve been given the chance to present at a technology seminar at the Kennedy Space Center.

 

In the wave of 21st century technology, our sights are set on all that the future holds for our industry and we couldn’t be more proud to be a part of it. On Friday, May 9, 2014, our product managers and wireless application specialists will be presenting wireless application trends and the future of fiber optic communications. For NASA!

 


The Facts on Fiber

 

Our team plans to discuss a variety of fiber optic technology trends and future applications. The first will explain and examine the increasingly relevant crossover between commercial and military grade products.

 

It’s a common misconception that if an organization is qualified as a “government” or “military” entity, it absolutely must use military grade fiber products. This isn’t necessarily the case. What we want to emphasize is that it’s important to analyze all characteristics and factors within the application in order to get the best product match, as well as the best use of one’s money. 

 

For example: a military grade cable might be applicable in a certain outdoor location where large trucks and tanks run over it. But, if each end of that cable runs into a building where it‘s protected, a commercial grade connector or cable assembly could likely be a viable option.

 

It’s also important for us to mention how fiber has evolved. Fiber is no longer just a delicate and expensive cable option. Not only is fiber capable of being used in a rugged application, but it is also an efficient green choice that saves energy. To put this into perspective- one single fiber cable can be run 100 kilometers without a connection break-up or even having to use additional electrical repeater equipment for support along the way.

 

Other fiber optic topics that we’ll discuss are port density, cable weight, and the relatively new MPO connectors. Our hands-on discussion will also focus on how advancements in RF and optical networks will help NASA achieve new design insight. 

 

Lastly, we plan to touch on the topic of security in relation to fiber optics. In the past it was believed that fiber cable was “un-tapable.” However, there is knowledge to prove that fiber actually can be tapped into, so it might be worth considering taking certain safety precautions for the security of the data being passed.

 

 

What about Wireless?

 

In addition to our focus on fiber technology, we will also hold a technical discussion about the next generation Wi-Fi standard, 802.11ac technology. 802.11ac has the ability to support up to eight MIMO spatial streams, with a lot more functionality. Check out our recent post about 802.11ac technology here.

 

In relation to 802.11ac, we will also discuss MIMO technology and using MIMO compliant dual polarity antennas. Our presentation will include the latest in new MIMO wireless technology that provides improved spectral efficiency along with increased link capacity and reliability.  

 

By utilizing multiple antennas you can increase the data throughput and range, compared to a single antenna using the same radio transmit power. Additionally, MIMO antennas improve link reliability and experience less fading than a single antenna system. By transmitting multiple data streams at the same time, wireless capacity is increased.

 

Overall, there's lots of exciting stuff propagating in the world of wireless and fiber optic technology.


What do you foresee in the future?


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