How to Extend the Range of Your Wireless Signal

September 4, 2013 at 10:00 AM

 

 

One of the most common questions we are asked is: "How do I extend my WiFi signal?" Whether you need extension for an indoor or outdoor application, here are your options:

 

Use a higher gain antenna: By using a higher gain antenna you can extend your wireless signal range, though one thing to consider when using a higher gain antenna is potential loss of vertical signal coverage. Typically when you increase the gain on an antenna the RF gain pattern becomes more focused and produces a narrower horizontal beam. Read more about this phenomenon of higher gain causing less vertical signal coverage.

 

Add a WiFi amplifier: By adding a WiFi amplifier you can boost your wireless signal. We suggest trying one of our WiFi booster kits that are available for purchase by anyone in the United States without the need for a special FCC license. These kits offer easy set up and strong signal extension and coverage capabilities. Additionally we offer RF amplifiers for export, military and FCC licensed users supporting frequencies ranging from 900 MHz to 5.8 GHz.

 

Upgrade from 802.11b/g to 802.11n: If you are currently using 802.11b or 802.11g access points and wireless adapters, consider upgrading to the latest IEEE standard, 802.11n. 802.11n offers better range and speed than 802.11b and 802.11g standards products.

 

Use a higher power Access Point: A typical WiFi router or Access Point provides about 30mW of transmit power. By upgrading to a higher power access point or router you can boost your wireless signal resulting in extended coverage.

 

As with any wireless installation, Line of Sight and the Fresnel Zone must be considered along with other factors such as multipath interference. These phenomena and your physical environment (obstacles, obstructions etc.) all affect your signal strength and range.

 

WiFi Antennas WiFi Amplifiers WiFi Access Points
WiFi Antennas WiFi Amplifiers WiFi Access Points

 

By using one or a combination of these aforementioned upgrades and additions you can provide greater wireless signal coverage. Good luck!

 

What Does MIMO Mean?

August 7, 2013 at 10:00 AM

Multiple-in/Multiple-out Antennas (MIMO) Explained

 

MIMO Panel Antenna Showing Multiple Coaxial Lines

Most antennas have worked very simply: a frequency transmitted from one antenna could be picked up by a antenna tuned to receive it a distance away without the need of cables between them. While this basic description of a wireless system works, today we have many ways to improve upon the basic concept to increase things like redundancy and coverage. One of those methods is MIMO, which stands for multiple-in multiple-out.

 

MIMO antennas are actually several antennas all within a single physical item or radome. They co-exist either by working in different bands (as the IEEE standard 802.11n works, in both 2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz) or different polarities, or both. By breaking the data into separate signals and broadcasting them over multiple antennas, MIMO systems can pick from the strongest signal no matter what the environmental conditions.

 

If you have a radio, access point, router or other wireless device that uses MIMO transmission, you will usually see separate jacks for the different signals. Likewise, a MIMO antenna will have multiple jacks or cables to hook up. Once they are plugged in, the antenna takes advantage of a phenomenon called "multipath", which refers to the way multiple signals bounce off of objects and arrive at the receiver at slightly different times.

 

Quick note: L-com's HyperLink® MIMO antenna product center includes options for many popular bands and antenna types.

How to Install Wireless Amplifiers

July 10, 2013 at 10:00 AM

 Setting up a WiFi Booster for an Indoor Wireless System

 

An Assortment of WiFi Amplifiers

If you do not work with wireless components every day, the prospect of adding a new component to boost the power of your signal may seem daunting. While we always recommend you have a professional install communications equipment to ensure it is done correctly, this brief tutorial will give you the basic steps to set up a simple WiFi booster. If it helps, you can also take a look at the video in this post or visit our complete tutorial here.

 

 

 

If you have a WLAN setup that requires a stronger signal, a simple WiFi booster may do the trick. Due to FCC regulations, if you are doing this installation in the United States, you need FCC approval to buy the amplifier. If you don't need an amplifier with power over 1 Watt, you can purchase an FCC certified amplifier kit which requires no special operator's license. Either way, most setups follow this simple procedure.

 

Diagram of an RF amplifier setup

On the amplifier, you will typically see two coaxial cable jacks, one labeled "Antenna" and the other labeled "Radio". There should also be a power jack (usually a DC jack requiring an external power adapter), which is where the amplifier gets the power to repeat the signal.

 

Using low-loss coaxial cable, simply connect the antenna to the antenna jack on the amplifier, and the radio (or access point or router, etc) to the radio jack. Then, after the two sides are hooked up, attach the power adapter and plug it in. Most amplifiers have LED lights to indicate activity, which helps you to see if it is working.

 

It's that easy!

 

Quick note: L-com has a huge selection of top-quality wireless RF amplifiers for the 2.4 GHz WiFi band and 5.8 GHz WiFi band, as well as 900 MHz, 3.5 GHz, and 4.9 GHz frequencies. These ampifiers feature HyperLink's® Active Power Control (APC), which automatically maintains a constant output power regardless of the length of the attached cables. Aside from the indoor wireless amplifiers, L-com also carries HyperLink® brand outdoor wireless amplifiers for all-weather operation.
 

Tutorial on Wireless Networking

June 12, 2013 at 10:00 AM

 

Wireless network antenna and devices

Entire cities and even countries are looking into ways to expand communications access for their residents as the Internet has shifted from a luxury to an imperative. The most promising solution: wireless networking.

 

Why? Wireless networking allows a non-physical (well, at least non-cabled) connection to a wireless LAN (WLAN) and onto the World Wide Web for users. So what are you waiting for? Cut the cord!

 

Be mindful of this though- issues such as network and band congestion, security, signal range and propagation, power demands, and more make WLANs tricky to implement for all but the most informed network engineers and IT professionals. Yet there's no stopping this technology in its rapid advance, with solutions such as distributed antenna systems (DAS) and MESH networks beginning to show promise. For you to get started, here's a basic wireless tutorial on terminology and concepts.

 


Wireless Standards

 

Radio frequency signals can take a lot of different forms, so in order for devices made by different manufacturers to communicate, the IEEE has provided several standards including the mainstay for wireless Ethernet: 802.11.

 

The 802.11 standard specifies the band and IP protocol used to transmit data, and provides guidelines to maximize the speed of transmission. 802.11a, for instance, uses the 5Ghz band and can typically transmit at speeds up to 54 Mbps in shorter ranges. 802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11n, and the new 802.11ac all use various methods to increase the speed and range. The latest IEEE wireless standard, 802.11ac boasts transmission speeds of up to 1 Gbps!

 

Each standard typically requires wireless routers, access points, and other transmission equipment to match its designation, though there are many that can operate in multiple standards (such as routers that are 802.11b/g/n compliant).

 


Wireless Bands

 

In attempt to maintain order within the entire radio frequency spectrum that is available to us, the FCC and other global communications standardization organizations have designated or set aside specific ranges of frequencies for specific uses. We call these "ISM bands". ISM stands for industrial, scientific and medical to denote where these frequencies are used.  ISM bands (specifically the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies) are also used in commercial wireless networks. 

 

Typically access points, antennas, and amplifiers all use either the 2.4 GHz band, 5.8 GHz band, or both for WiFi. Other ISM bands have been set aside for things like cell phone use, RFID chips, emergency/municipal use, and military use.

 


Wireless Security

 

As mentioned previously, one of the big emerging issues with wireless networking is security. Without a physical cable that can be plugged and unplugged, the only method to control who can do what on a network is to build it into the software and protocol. That means it is critical to set up a wireless network with appropriate security measures and to be aware of the security status of any network you connect to.

 

For most small networks, methods such as WPA, WPA2, or WPA-PSK allow the safe identification of nodes that should be allowed on a network with passwords and other controls. Wireless routers can also use access passwords to allow administrators to adjust or update security features as required.

 
If you have questions about a wireless project or application, contact L-com's technical support line for a live response and expert advice!
 
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