USB 3.1 Gen 1 vs. Gen 2

August 9, 2018 at 8:00 AM

 

Not sure of the difference between USB 3.1 Gen 1 (aka SuperSpeed USB) and USB 3.1. Gen 2 (aka SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps or SuperSpeed+)? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. USB has rebranded and restructured how it differentiates between the two, leaving many scratching their heads as to which is which. Have no fear though, we’ve got it all figured out and are here to clear it up for you.

 

If you were impressed by the super speeds brought to you courtesy of USB 3.1, then you’re going to be over the moon for USB 3.1 Gen 2. This iteration of USB technology bolsters speeds and delivers additional benefits sure to please all users. As its name suggests, SuperSpeed+ USB increases the data transfer rate from 5 Gbps to 10 Gbps, making it twice as fast as USB 3.1 Gen 1 and on par with first generation Thunderbolt technology. USB 3.1 Gen 2 also uses more efficient data encoding, which not only increases throughput, but also improves I/O power efficiency.

 

Though the maximum cable length is shortened from 5 meters to 1 meter, USB 3.1 Gen 2 maintains the capability of data plus power over one cable and it can support multiple cameras and the USB3 Vision standard. Plus, USB 3.1 Gen 2 increases the power delivery level from 4.5 Watts to an astounding 100 Watts. This standard will also support USB Type-C, USB DisplayPort over Type-C and USB Power Delivery.

 

USB 3.1 Gen 2 is fully backward compatible with existing USB 3.0 software and devices, 5 Gbps hubs and devices as well as USB 2.0 products. In case there’s still some lingering confusion, here’s a handy chart to help compare these two side-by-side.

  

 

USB 3.1 Gen 1

USB 3.1 Gen 2

Data Rate

5 Gbps

10 Gbps

Power Delivery

4.5 W

100 W

Max Cable Length

5 m

1 m

Multiple Cameras

P

P

USB3 Vision

P

P

Data + Power

P

P

 

 

GigE Vision – A Clear Standard

July 19, 2018 at 8:00 AM

 

As big data has gotten bigger and bigger, so have vision applications. GigE Vision is a global interface standard designed to support the transmission of high-speed video and related control data over Ethernet networks that include GigE, 10 GigE and 802.11 wireless networks.

 

This standard was developed using the Gigabit Ethernet communication protocol and provides fast image transfer using readily available Ethernet cables over extended distances. GigE Vision is capable of fast, high-bandwidth transfers of large images in real time at 125 MB/s and up to 100 meters in length. With the use of standard Cat5e and Cat6 cables and connectors, using GigE Vision is cost effective, highly scalable and allows for simple integration by using existing Ethernet infrastructures.

 

Managed by the AIA, a trade association for the machine vision industry, the GigE Vision standard was introduced in 2006 and has since been adopted globally, with most major industrial video hardware and software vendors having developed products that are GigE Vision-compliant. By following the same standard, products from different vendors are all interoperable. This means frame grabbers, embedded hardware interfaces, cameras, video servers, video receivers control applications and management entities can all work together seamlessly using a common Ethernet platform.

 

Much like USB3 Vision, GigE Vision relies on GenICam, a generic programming interface for different types of cameras, to access and control features in cameras and other imaging devices that are compliant. The simplicity of installation and high performance specs of GigE Vision makes it ideal for industrial applications. The standard is also used in telecom, military, data communications and machine vision applications.

 

GigE Vision is currently at version 2.0, which includes non-streaming device control, faster streaming over 10 Gig Ethernet and link aggregation. Version 2.0 is ideal for multi-camera systems and introduced the Precision Time Protocol (PTP) that enables cameras to be activated at the same time and Trigger-over-Ethernet without the need for an I/O cable. It also allows for multi-camera systems to be precisely synchronized, compressed images to be transmitted and enhanced support for multi-tap sensors. With all of its capabilities and benefits, GigE Vision has proven to be a boon in the world of vision applications.

 

Machine Vision and USB

September 22, 2016 at 8:00 AM

  

Machine vision systems are a great way for manufacturers to use advanced image capture and analysis to streamline inspection and production processes.

 

From military to medical to industrial, this technology can be applied across various industries to reduce defects, increase productivity and make manufacturing more efficient. As machine vision systems are being deployed globally, USB3 Vision cable assemblies are a top choice to support the technology.

 

USB3 Vision cables offer the ease of connection that we have come to expect from USB, with speeds fast enough to support machine vision applications.  With a data throughput rate 10 times faster than USB 2.0 (4.8 Gbps vs. 480 Mbps), USB3 Vision cables are perfectly suited to become the most popular machine vision interface.

 

The increased bandwidth substantially reduces the time required for transferring large amounts of data or video, even when supporting 4K UHD resolution. In addition to high data transmission rates, USB3 Vision cables also provide up to 4.5W of power over five meters or more and can easily be scaled to support multiple cameras.

 

Based on the USB 3.0 standard, the USB3 Vision interface uses USB 3.0 ports that are expected to become standard on most PCs in the near future. Having the plug-and-play interface readily available on most devices will make communication between devices from different manufacturers simple and easy.

 

With features including high bandwidth, ease of use, and low cost, USB3 Vision cables are ideal for machine vision applications across many sectors. To view L-com’s complete line of AIA-certified USB3 Vision cables, click here.

 

For more information on this topic, read our blog post How USB is Shaping the Future of Machine Vision.

 

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