Tips on Selecting an Ethernet Media Converter

January 9, 2014 at 10:00 AM


L-com Industrial Ethernet Media Converter (DIN Rail mounting)

Fiber optic technology is taking the Ethernet networking world by storm. It is faster, completely resistant to EMI/RFI, and offers incredible distances between nodes.

 

But fiber is not quite ready for all LAN applications. In many cases it makes sense to keep a copper network intact and lay a fiber network over it. So, here we find a need in our industry for a device that will convert seamlessly between the fiber optic network and the copper network without loss of speed.

 

We call these devices Ethernet media converters.

 

 

Industrial vs. Commercial

 

Commercial Media Converters

The first consideration in finding the proper converter for your application is whether your Ethernet media converter will be installed in a commercial or industrial environment. A commercial environment would include a typical office or clean room, and an industrial environment includes places with dust, moisture, temperature variations, vibrations, and other complications.

 

We've gone over the differences between the two in regards to switches before, but the same rules apply for media converters. It is very important not to confuse industrial versus commercial converters. While an industrial Ethernet media converter can operate in a commercial environment, it costs more and generally supports features not commonly found in a commercial environment such as DC power. On the other hand, a commercial Ethernet media converter should not be used in an industrial environment as network downtime and system failure can occur.

 


Single mode vs. Multimode

 

Fiber Glass Types

There are two main "modes" for fiber optic cabling: single mode and multimode. L-com has a great tutorial and video with in-depth explanation. In general, a single mode system is more expensive, but also provides better signal strength over large distances (up to 100km or more).

 

Multimode is much more affordable and can be used in distances of up to 2km, depending on network speed and bandwidth. Again, don't confuse the two! If you are running multimode cable, you need a multimode Ethernet media converter; a single mode version will not work.

 


Fiber Optic Connector Types

 

 

Fiber optic cables have their own unique connector types. There's a good video explaining fiber connectors here. Unlike copper, fiber connectors are very difficult to install properly in the field, and there aren't many options for converting a connector type with a passive adapter (although L-com does carry ST-SC, ST-FC and LC-SC adapters, among others, on its fiber optic adapters page). It is best to match the connector type with the device so they can be easily connected and no extra loss is incurred.

 

Remember, L-com stocks hundreds of factory terminated fiber optic cables off-the-shelf. We can custom manufacture fiber cables without minimum order quantities and with very short lead times, so you don't need to re-terminate or adapt a mismatched cable.

 

 

Other Features

 

Before ordering your media converter, also consider things like mounting method (DIN rails, 19" racks or chassis, or just placed on a shelf), network speed (10/100/1000 Mbps), and how you will get power to the unit. A properly installed media converter can both future-proof and provide redundancy for your network for years to come!

 

Quick note: Installing Ethernet media converters may require other components as well, such as fiber optic cables, Ethernet cables, and racks and accessories.
 

Understanding Copper/Fiber Media Converters

August 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM

What is a Media Converter?

 

Diagram of fiber optic premise wiring converted to copper with media converters

A media converter is used to extend Cat 5e/6 Ethernet cabling to distances beyond the 100 meter maximum for Ethernet by converting IP voice/video/data signals to fiber optic cabling.

 

Where are Media Converters used?

 

Media converters are used in environments where EMI/RFI is present, such as manufacturing facilities and other industrial environments. Other applications include campus networks where many buildings need to be connected via fiber. Also, high-rise buildings typically use a fiber backbone, which is laid vertically and taps into copper (UTP) networks on each floor via a media converter.

 

L-com's Media Converter offering

 

L-com offers media converters designed for both commercial and industrial use.

 

Commercial-grade fiber-to-copper media converters from L-com

 

L-com Ethernet Media Converter 10/100TX to 100FX MM SC 2km

- Plug-and-play installation
- Rugged metal case ensure longevity
- Multimode and Single-mode versions available
- Easy-to-read LEDs provide at-a-glance system status information
- Operating temp: 0°C to +70°C 

 

Industrial DIN Rail Media Converters from L-com

 

LCMC Media Converters

- 35mm DIN rail mounting
- Rugged aluminum case
- 24V DC power input
- Plug and play
- Operating temp: -40°C to +70°C

 

Cabling for LAN and Premise Architecture

July 31, 2013 at 10:00 AM

 

Diagram of Wiring Closet Rack

It's hard to fathom just how quickly Ethernet technology has grown. Today no modern office building would be functional without premise wiring, or the cabling run throughout the building to connect computers to the LAN.

 

We may be on the verge of a wireless revolution with new technologies like DAS and MESH, but for now you should at least understand the basic architecture of LAN cabling.

 

LAN wiring is often broken into three types: backbone, horizontal runs, and patch cabling, each with its own purpose and requirements. In an especially large building or in a campus of buildings, the backbone is the wiring that connects server locations together and to the Internet through an ISP. Since a large amount of data may be carried back and forth by these cables, they are typically designed for bandwidth, like T1 lines or fiber optic cables (usually multi-fiber lines like breakout or distribution style, or even ribbon fibers).

 

Close Up View of Solid Conductor Category-rated Cable

The horizontal runs are the individual cables coming from the servers to the Work Areas. Work Areas are the points where the cable is terminated in a wall plate or jack so a user can plug their computer or other device into it.

 

It is often deceptive to assume that a single horizontal run will connect to a single computer. More likely than not, it is connected into a local Ethernet switch or wireless access point, and many computers may be connected to that. For this reason, the actual data carried on a single horizontal cable could vary greatly, and if you are planning your LAN architecture, this is the trickiest thing to get right. It can also be the most expensive piece to change if you get it wrong as you may need to fish the cable back out of a wall or conduit to re-arrange it.

 

Horizontal runs are currently most often solid-conductor Category rated copper cable. This is slowly changing over to fiber optic cabling as the price gap between the two narrows and fiber optic technology improves. Note that the horizontal cable may also require special jacket types to comply with building fire codes.

 

Right Angle Ethernet Cable Assembly

The patch cabling in a LAN is often overlooked, but is also very important. In general it is used to connect two devices together in a rack in a server room, or to connect a device to a wall jack where a horizontal cable is terminated. Being exposed (not behind a wall or on a rack ladder) and possibly being moved frequently, a patch cable needs to be robust and flexible.

 

While patch cables are easily available and can be bought relatively cheap, you might want to consider that cheap cables may introduce problems to your LAN. Cheap cables often use substitute materials such as copper clad aluminum or feature low quality plugs not rated for the application. Cheap cables seldom pass the testing required for the network and will degrade your network performance.

 

With more devices requiring power (POE), the cheaper cables often cannot carry the added burden due to undersized conductors and low grade copper. For a single user's computer, the impact of this may be limited, but in a server room low quality cables can have a disastrous effect on the entire LAN. If the cable manufacturer you purchase from has a robust QC process, it will help.

 

Other features to consider are molded right angle connectors to ensure the connector isn't bent to fit into limited space, cable boots to make depressing the connector latch easier, and high-flex construction and oil resistant jackets for demanding environments.

 

L-com stocks components for every facet of your LAN, from Ethernet cables, plugs and jacks, to bulk copper or fiber cable, to active media converters. We also go beyond that, to reliable racks, panels and cable management accessories, lightning and surge protectors, Power-over-Ethernet components and everything for wireless deployment.

 

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