Ethernet Switch Showdown: Commercial vs. Industrial

August 10, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

An Ethernet switch is a great way to create a Local Area Network (LAN) to share resources. Ethernet switch LANs can allow an entire office to share the use of printers, servers, Internet connections and other Internet Protocol (IP)-based applications.

 

For decades, Ethernet switches were limited to climate-controlled IT closets and buildings for use in commercial and office networks. In recent years, their use has expanded to include Ethernet-based industrial IP networks for manufacturing, automation and process industries.

 

Here, we’ll look at the major features of commercial and industrial switches and how they differ from one another.

 

Commercial Ethernet Switches:

  • •   Designed for desk or rack mounting in controlled environments such as IT closets        and data centers
  • •   110V-240V AC powered
  • •   Limited operating temperature range, typically between 50° F to 95°F
  • •   Cannot withstand shock and vibration
  • •   Single Point of Failure (SPOF): many commercial grade switches depend on               cooling fans and other components that can compromise the entire switch if they         fail 
  • •   Most have lower Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) than industrial switches

 

Industrial Ethernet Switches:   

  • •  Designed for harsh environments with extreme temperatures, vibration, dust and        moisture
  • •  Typically used in manufacturing facilities, mining, oil production, power plants,            waste water treatment plants and other extreme environments
  • •  Usually do not have any moving parts, such as fans (SPOF)
  • •  Conformal coating used in damp environments to cover PCB and protect                    components
  • •  Wide operating temperature range, typically from -40° F to 167°F
  • •  DIN rail mounting and small form factor allows switches to take up minimal space
  • •  Safety Extra-Low Voltage (SELV): accepting 24 V DC power makes industrial switches safer than higher powered switches
  • •  Many have an Ingress protection (IP) rating which allows the switches to resist dirt, dust and wash down
 

White Paper: Layer 3 Routing at the Network Edge

July 13, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

Implementing Layer 3 at the edge of a LAN can have many benefits including increased network security, greater availability and improved network utilization, but it’s not always clear where Layer 3 routing should be used in the LAN. Traditionally, Layer 3 routers were at the core of the networks and acted as gateways to the Wide Area Network. As technology, pricing and availability have changed, Layer 3 routing has moved closer to the edge of the network. 

 

Our white paper discusses when to employ a Layer 3 switch at the edge of a network and gives definitions and applications for several widely used routing protocols including RIP, DVMRP, PIM and OSPF.

 

Topics covered in our Layer 3 white paper include:

 

Layer 2 Switching vs. Layer 3 Routing

 

Defining Layer 3 Routing Protocols

    -      Routing Information Protocol (RIP)

    -      Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)

    -      Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)

    -      Dstance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP)

    -      Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM)

    -      Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP)

 

Layer 3 Routing Applications

    -      Assigning static IP routes to VLAN/Sublets

    -      Routing between Layer 2 VLAN

    -      Routing on high-speed uplinks to the core

    -      IP multicast routing with IGMP and DVMRP

    -      PIM-DM multicast routing in the LAN

    -      PIM-SM multicast routing protocol

    -      OSPF to route IP traffic through LAN into the core router

    -      VRRP in the LAN

 

Click here to read our Layer 3 Routing at the Network Edge white paper.

 

All our free white papers are available from our website by clicking here.

 

© L-com, Inc. All Rights Reserved. L-com, Inc., 50 High Street, West Mill, Third Floor, Suite 30, North Andover, MA 01845