5 Things You Need to Know About the Cloud

August 31, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

If you’re like most people, you probably have pictures or some other type of files stored in the cloud, but do you really understand what the cloud is? For many people, the cloud remains a mystical place that they still can’t quite comprehend. Here are 5 things you need to know about the cloud:

 

1.  When something is stored in the cloud, it is actually in a physical place. The cloud is like a giant IT data center, it is a massive infrastructure of thousands of servers that are connected by cables, switches, connectors and patch panels. All of these parts work together to store data, provide virtual desktops, global data access and more.

 

2.  Cloud computing relies on many geographically dispersed servers that provide millions of people with reliable and limitless access to their library of and images, video, audio and data files through the Internet. This frees up local RAM and hard drive space, but it also means that the interconnect components that make up the cloud need to be fast and dependable to keep up with user demand.

 

3.  The consumer cloud is different than a cloud for business. Consumer cloud computing is for those using cloud Internet services casually at home or in small offices. When it comes to business, there are several cloud models being used:

 

-  Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) – businesses subscribe to an application that is accessed using the Internet

-  Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) – businesses create their own custom application for everyone in the company      to use

-  Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) – the big names in tech (Amazon, Google, Microsoft, etc.) provide a              backbone that can be used or “rented” for use by other companies

 

4.  The cloud is big business and is having a big impact on business. Worldwide public cloud services are anticipated to grow 18% this year to reach $246.8 billion. Cloud computing is also expected to be the most measurable factor impacting businesses in 2017. Cloud platforms allow for more complex business models and coordination of globally integrated networks – more so than many experts predicted. Cloud services are also increasingly being used by small and medium businesses, which is also increasing the revenue forecast.

 

5.  The Internet of Things (IoT) continues to grow, and with the IoT has come increased use of cloud computing technology. Eventually, IoT devices may become extensions of cloud data centers.  The cloud is a powerful force in the technology industry and a global trend that doesn’t seem to be slowing down.

 

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5 Things You Need to Know About Industrial IoT

July 6, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

With the Internet of Things promising a world that is fully automated where objects can communicate without humans, it only makes sense that this technology could be used in other ways –enter the Industrial IoT (IIoT). This next iteration of the IoT applies the IoT technology to industrial applications and is slated to revolutionize the way we do business. Here are 5 things you need to know about the Industrial IoT:

 

1.       It’s smart business

We’ve heard of smart houses, smart cars and even smart cities, now we’ll have smart businesses. The goal of the IIoT is to improve efficiency, productivity and operations on a global scale by linking people, data and intelligent machines. Machines will be able to communicate and work with each other in machine to machine (M2M) networks to optimize production and workflow. 


2.       It takes business into the Cloud

The IIoT integrates physical machinery with software and sensors that can be networked to the Cloud to provide real-time visibility of business assets. These smart machines deliver data that is analyzed and used to monitor and control operations and make real-time decisions, which improves operational efficiency, saves money and reduces waste.

 

3.       It is applicable across a range of industries

Pilot projects have tested and proven that the IIoT can be impactful across a large spectrum of industries that include healthcare, manufacturing, logistics, energy and agriculture.

 

4.       It breathes new life into old equipment

The IIoT will connect more than a century’s worth of existing mechanical and electrical infrastructure to the Internet. This includes manufacturing equipment, fleet tracking and HVAC systems. The IIoT has the power to reduce waste and improve operating costs with features such as a service alert sent before equipment breaks down, or monitoring the flow of gas valves in a refinery.

 

5.       It is the future of business

The IIoT is projected to be one of the fastest growing markets over the next several years with as many as 25 billion IP-enabled "things" being networked by 2020. It has been forecasted that the IIoT will generate nearly $320 billion in worldwide revenue and over 26% CAGR by 2020.

 

HaLow Wi-Fi for the IoT

April 13, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 


The Internet of Things (IoT) might have found a saving grace for keeping all of those “things” connected. HaLow Wi-Fi, pronounced like halo (hay-low), is coming to scene with a list of virtues p

erfect for smart homes, smart cars, smart cities, and even healthcare, industrial, retail and agriculture.

 

Generally, we’re used to Wi-Fi aiming to achieve lightning fast speeds with the ability to move large amounts of data.  But with IoT devices, there’s no need for super-speeds and the amount of data being transmitted is typically small.  The real need of the IoT is for devices to remain connected wherever they are without dwindling power supplies or depending on cellular data. 

 

HaLow Wi-Fi is slated to offer double the coverage range of traditional Wi-Fi while lowering power consumption. This would not only set it apart from other Wi-Fi standards, but also make it ideal for many IoT applications. Thus, the Wi-Fi Alliance is hoping HaLow will replace cellular networks in smart cities and Bluetooth radios in wearable devices.

 

HaLow is an extension of the IEEE 802.11ah standard and uses the 900 MHz bandwidth instead of the 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz bands. The 900 MHz band is a low-frequency workhorse usually reserved for microwaves ovens and baby monitors. By using this robust frequency for Wi-Fi, the signal is able to reach further and penetrate objects and obstacles without dwindling the device’s power supply – many of which run solely on batteries.

 

Reported data rates for Halow are between 150 kilobits and 18 megabits per second. This is significantly less than traditional Wi-Fi rates, but speed is not the focus in this case. For the IoT,  power consumption, reliability and distance are the priority. The HaLow standard will be official next year and might be exactly the  divine intervention needed for the IoT.

 

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Big Data and the Information Autobahn

November 5, 2015 at 8:00 AM

 

By 2017 the amount of data transported globally through mobile networks is expected to reach a staggering 7.7 zettabytes (7.7 billion terabytes), and this will be only a portion of the total data being processed in and out of data centers around the world.

 

To handle the massive throughput required these trillions of bits of data will require high-speed-connection technology such as fiber optics and 40GBASE-T Ethernet.

 

The data centers of today often employ Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet as a backbone technology and in many cases utilize Gigabit to the desktop due to the lowering cost of Gigabit Ethernet switches and interface cards. Until now this was sufficient throughput for most SMB and Enterprise networks. But with the explosion of Big Data and IoT applications this will no longer be longer adequate.  Users will require access to huge global databases as well thousands of IP enabled devices in order to run their business.

 

10GBASE-T or 10-Gig Ethernet over copper twisted pair cabling was standardized in 2006 and can be used with both Category 6 cabling (max distance 55 meters) , Category 6a cabling (max distance 100 meters) and the newer Category 7 cabling (max distance 100 meters).

 

40GBASE-T or 40-Gig Ethernet is currently in development along with Category 8 cabling that will be required to run 40-Gig over copper twisted pair.

 

Another viable option for Big Data’s throughput requirements is fiber optic connectivity. Although usually more costly than a copper based solution, fiber can, right now, support Terabits of throughput on a solitary, Single mode fiber cable. The higher system cost is due to the expensive laser driven fiber transceivers that are required to transmit and receive voice, video and data packets at blazing fast speeds.

 

The future is clear, the demand for data by businesses and consumers will grow exponentially and using fiber optic and high speed Ethernet connectivity will make meeting this demand possible. 

 

Embedded Antennas Connecting our World

October 22, 2015 at 8:00 AM

 

Imagine a world where machines communicate without human involvement. Now take that a step further and picture a world that is fully automated. With the development of the Internet of Things (IoT), this world could become a reality.

 

The IoT is a network of physical objects embedded with technology that will offer advanced connectivity and a seamless exchange of data with little or no human interaction. 

 

How is all of this going to be possible? With the adoption of the IoT comes the development of advanced mobility technologies and the integration of embedded antenna technology. 

 

Embedded antennas are small, yet powerful with multiband systems used for mobile voice, video and data applications.

 

Embedded antennas’ key performance attributes include high efficiency, low power consumption, low return loss and isolation.

 

High efficiency brings better signal reception, which improves the system’s ability for faster data transfer rates. Reduced power consumption allows for increased mobility. Less return loss means more power transmitted, and isolation limits the amount of crosstalk interference.

 

Embedded antennas can work with high-frequency or low-frequency systems, some feature MIMO technology and smart antennas have been introduced that feature embedded GPS and Flash memory capabilities.

 

IoT is expected to exceed machine-to-machine communications and usher in global automation that will encompass both personal and business applications.  It is also expected to produce large amounts of data to be collected at extremely high speeds. With all of these things connecting to one another, embedded antennas will play a key role in the future of IoT applications.

 

 

  

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