5 Things You Need to Know About Industrial IoT

July 6, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

With the Internet of Things promising a world that is fully automated where objects can communicate without humans, it only makes sense that this technology could be used in other ways –enter the Industrial IoT (IIoT). This next iteration of the IoT applies the IoT technology to industrial applications and is slated to revolutionize the way we do business. Here are 5 things you need to know about the Industrial IoT:

 

1.       It’s smart business

We’ve heard of smart houses, smart cars and even smart cities, now we’ll have smart businesses. The goal of the IIoT is to improve efficiency, productivity and operations on a global scale by linking people, data and intelligent machines. Machines will be able to communicate and work with each other in machine to machine (M2M) networks to optimize production and workflow. 


2.       It takes business into the Cloud

The IIoT integrates physical machinery with software and sensors that can be networked to the Cloud to provide real-time visibility of business assets. These smart machines deliver data that is analyzed and used to monitor and control operations and make real-time decisions, which improves operational efficiency, saves money and reduces waste.

 

3.       It is applicable across a range of industries

Pilot projects have tested and proven that the IIoT can be impactful across a large spectrum of industries that include healthcare, manufacturing, logistics, energy and agriculture.

 

4.       It breathes new life into old equipment

The IIoT will connect more than a century’s worth of existing mechanical and electrical infrastructure to the Internet. This includes manufacturing equipment, fleet tracking and HVAC systems. The IIoT has the power to reduce waste and improve operating costs with features such as a service alert sent before equipment breaks down, or monitoring the flow of gas valves in a refinery.

 

5.       It is the future of business

The IIoT is projected to be one of the fastest growing markets over the next several years with as many as 25 billion IP-enabled "things" being networked by 2020. It has been forecasted that the IIoT will generate nearly $320 billion in worldwide revenue and over 26% CAGR by 2020.

 

Our New IoT White Paper

May 5, 2016 at 8:00 AM

 

Do you know all of the “things” that make-up the Internet of Things (IoT)? 

 

Are you familiar with both IoT models and how they are being applied?

 

Would you consider yourself well-versed in all IoT applications?

 

If you answered no to these questions, or want to test your knowledge, you’re in luck. We have just released a new white paper that outlines the history, benefits and future of the IoT.

 

From its inception in 1999, the IoT has grown from a far-fetched idea to a tangible reality. Our white paper takes a deeper look at the Internet of Things, exploring its origins, evolution, how it’s being deployed and what the future may hold. With the implementation of IoT technology, “things” or devices that are IP addressable can be monitored, controlled and are able to communicate with each other – making our world more efficient and easier to navigate. This ground-breaking technology is coming to fruition and promises to innovate today’s world and shape the world of tomorrow.  Whether you are a novice or expert in all things IoT-related, our white paper will provide you with the information you need to stay connected.  

 

Topics include:

·       IoT Defined

·       History/Background

·       The Internet of Things: Limitless Applications

- Industrial Automation

- Transportation

- Healthcare

- Agriculture

- Energy

- Consumer

·       Case Studies

·       Factors Perpetuating the IoT model

·       Future of IoT

 

Click here to view our IoT white paper.

 

Big Data and the Information Autobahn

November 5, 2015 at 8:00 AM

 

By 2017 the amount of data transported globally through mobile networks is expected to reach a staggering 7.7 zettabytes (7.7 billion terabytes), and this will be only a portion of the total data being processed in and out of data centers around the world.

 

To handle the massive throughput required these trillions of bits of data will require high-speed-connection technology such as fiber optics and 40GBASE-T Ethernet.

 

The data centers of today often employ Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet as a backbone technology and in many cases utilize Gigabit to the desktop due to the lowering cost of Gigabit Ethernet switches and interface cards. Until now this was sufficient throughput for most SMB and Enterprise networks. But with the explosion of Big Data and IoT applications this will no longer be longer adequate.  Users will require access to huge global databases as well thousands of IP enabled devices in order to run their business.

 

10GBASE-T or 10-Gig Ethernet over copper twisted pair cabling was standardized in 2006 and can be used with both Category 6 cabling (max distance 55 meters) , Category 6a cabling (max distance 100 meters) and the newer Category 7 cabling (max distance 100 meters).

 

40GBASE-T or 40-Gig Ethernet is currently in development along with Category 8 cabling that will be required to run 40-Gig over copper twisted pair.

 

Another viable option for Big Data’s throughput requirements is fiber optic connectivity. Although usually more costly than a copper based solution, fiber can, right now, support Terabits of throughput on a solitary, Single mode fiber cable. The higher system cost is due to the expensive laser driven fiber transceivers that are required to transmit and receive voice, video and data packets at blazing fast speeds.

 

The future is clear, the demand for data by businesses and consumers will grow exponentially and using fiber optic and high speed Ethernet connectivity will make meeting this demand possible. 

 

Embedded Antennas Connecting our World

October 22, 2015 at 8:00 AM

 

Imagine a world where machines communicate without human involvement. Now take that a step further and picture a world that is fully automated. With the development of the Internet of Things (IoT), this world could become a reality.

 

The IoT is a network of physical objects embedded with technology that will offer advanced connectivity and a seamless exchange of data with little or no human interaction. 

 

How is all of this going to be possible? With the adoption of the IoT comes the development of advanced mobility technologies and the integration of embedded antenna technology. 

 

Embedded antennas are small, yet powerful with multiband systems used for mobile voice, video and data applications.

 

Embedded antennas’ key performance attributes include high efficiency, low power consumption, low return loss and isolation.

 

High efficiency brings better signal reception, which improves the system’s ability for faster data transfer rates. Reduced power consumption allows for increased mobility. Less return loss means more power transmitted, and isolation limits the amount of crosstalk interference.

 

Embedded antennas can work with high-frequency or low-frequency systems, some feature MIMO technology and smart antennas have been introduced that feature embedded GPS and Flash memory capabilities.

 

IoT is expected to exceed machine-to-machine communications and usher in global automation that will encompass both personal and business applications.  It is also expected to produce large amounts of data to be collected at extremely high speeds. With all of these things connecting to one another, embedded antennas will play a key role in the future of IoT applications.

 

 

  

It’s an IP world with the Internet of Things (IoT)

August 21, 2014 at 10:00 AM

 

 

In today’s age of such accelerated technology advancements, we practically have the world at our fingertips.

 

Emergency services respond at the push of a button, robots work for us in factories, apps on our phones connect us with others across the world…

 

And it’s about to get even easier.

 

As 2014 marches on, the buzz around the term “Internet of things” or “IoT” is ever increasing due to the fact that its impact on our society has the potential to be dramatic within a relatively short span of time.

 

By now most of you may have already heard of this phenomenon, but just what does this term really mean? And what are the implications to our wired and wireless engineering world?

 

 

An Ecosystem of Sorts

 

IoT is the idea that just about every imaginable device that can provide either a control or monitoring function will someday have an IP address for access to the Internet. CISCO Systems, Inc. calls it the “Internet of Everything,” or the networked connection of people, processes, data, and things.

 

Imagine objects in your home, car, at work, and all around you having an IP address to connect to the cloud—providing immediate access via just about any device (Smart Phone, tablet, laptop, desktop computer, etc.).

 

And IoT is not just limited to devices; it’s encroaching upon use with people and animals too! Livestock monitoring and tracking, medical devices for monitoring, and preventative medicine on humans are just some examples. The concept is to have multiple vertical sectors operating in one connected ecosystem.

 

A few other examples of startup “things” that are popping up around the IoT world include: an all-in-one touch screen WiFi router and smart home hub, WiFi enabled smart outlets and plugs that allow you to adjust settings via smart phone, sensor enhanced trash bins, and a bracelet that measures sun exposure.

 

According to Business Insider Intelligence, the IoT will account for 9 billion connections by 2018. In addition, BI Intelligence estimates that the IoT alone will surpass the PC, Tablet, and phone market combined by 2017.

 

So what are the ramifications?

 

IoT has the power to influence energy savings, cost savings, remote control and monitoring for business and home applications, and more. By using smarter and more efficient tracking, analysis, and monitoring some businesses will have an opportunity for cost savings (such as an insurance company saving money with collision avoidance navigation systems).

 

 

What about Our Business?

 

Lucky for us engineering minded folks, IoT applications will require both wired and wireless networking infrastructures to operate.

 

Every device- such as a pressure sensor, temperature sensor, or flow control valve- will have an IP address that is connected to the internet or to an Ethernet network. Thus, any necessary equipment for Ethernet IP networks will be required.

 

According to the Silicon Valley Business Journal, the most lucrative benefactors of this new movement will be the companies making chips that power these devices and those who are building the systems that will connect the chips (rather than the companies making the actual appliances).

 

Our products such as Ethernet switches and converters, WiFi antennas and RF amplifiers are some examples of the products needed to support IoT applications.  As a designer and manufacturer of wired and wireless networking products we are excited to see where this IoT evolution will take us!

 

© L-com, Inc. All Rights Reserved. L-com, Inc., 50 High Street, West Mill, Third Floor, Suite 30, North Andover, MA 01845