What You Need to Know About 802.11ay

November 9, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

Products for 802.11ad have only begun hitting the market in the past year, and already the IEEE is working on improvements in the form of 802.11ay. This new and improved standard will expand upon 802.11ad technology by delivering faster and longer-range Wi-Fi networks. Expected to be released in late 2019, 802.11ay will increase bandwidth and improve the reliability and robustness of the unlicensed 60GHz millimeter wave spectrum. It will be designed to improve throughput, range and use-cases.

 

The next generation wireless standard promises significant improvements upon the 7 Gbps speed and 10-meter distance capabilities of 802.11ad. 802.11ay will be capable of transmission rates of 20 to 30 Gbps and distances of 30 meters with 11ay-to-11ay device setups. When channel bonding, MIMO and additional capabilities are added into the mix, it’s possible that 802.11ay will deliver speeds closer to 200 Gbps and extend transmission distances up to 300 meters.

  

As an amendment for improving the performance of the 802.11ad standard, 802.11ay will support the same broad applications and be backward compatible with the 802.11ad standard. 802.11ay will focus on new applications for mobile offloading, wireless docking and display connectivity. It will also be ideal for fixed point-to-point or point-to-multipoint outdoor backhaul applications. 802.11ay might also be used in internal mesh and backbone networks, to provide connectivity to VR headsets, support server backups and manage cloud applications that require low latency. The main targets for 802.11ay are DisplayPort, HDMI and USB connectivity, fast synch as well as short-range, high-bandwidth connectivity to TV and monitor displays. It could even act as a replacement for HDMI and USB and make the equipment more intuitive.

 

802.11ay is primed to pack a punch with super-charged 20 Gig speeds and greater transmission distance. This revolutionary IEEE standard will surely break records and set the standard for future wireless technology.

 

802.3bt and PoE

October 19, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

In 2003 the first Power over Ethernet (PoE) standard was ratified and today there are more than 100 million devices that use PoE. It is an easy to install solution that provides an integrated and safe power standard for worldwide use. PoE has been deployed in high-volume applications such a wireless access points (APs) and Internet protocol (IP) phones to allow communications equipment to be installed in locations where no AC power source is available or where adding an AC outlet would be too costly.

 

The main limitation of PoE is the amount of power it’s able to supply. Even the most recent standardized version of PoE, 802.3at, is only able to provide a maximum of 25.5 Watts of power to a device. This modest amount of power has limited PoE use in many applications that require more power. Plus, with an increasing number of devices simultaneously connecting to Ethernet networks, the need for more PoE power continues to grow.

 

To address the demand for higher power PoE, the IEEE has been working on a new standard, 802.3bt. This newest standard is slated to debut this year and aims to double or triple the power output of the current PoE standard, 802.3at. IEEE 802.3bt increases the maximum PoE power available by employing all four pairs of the structured wiring of an Ethernet cable. It delivers extended power management capabilities and enables multiple PoE classes while also being backward compatible. Additionally, the 802.3bt standard may also standardize PoE with 10Gbase-T.

 

The ability to provide higher power to end devices will drastically expand the number of applications able to use PoE. This will include high-volume applications such as point-of-sale, building management and industrial control systems. Delivering power and data on the same link with PoE will make life easier, and cheaper for design engineers who will be able to save time and money on installation when compared to running separate data and power lines. It also makes relocation of devices simple and as easy as moving a cable, rather than having to hire an electrician to move or add AC power outlets. 

 

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Read All About It: PoE White Paper

August 3, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

Power over Ethernet (PoE) is a revolutionary technique that provides both power and data in one Ethernet cable. PoE equipment eliminates the need to run power to remote network devices, which allows for greater flexibility and is ideal for remote locations where traditional power sources are not available. PoE can save time and money and is becoming more frequently used in wired and wireless connectivity applications with network devices such as wireless access points, switches and IP cameras.

 

Our white paper takes a deeper look at PoE, its history and how it is used in today’s telecommunications networks. Topics covered include:

 

History of PoE

  • -          How the IEEE was called upon to create the 802.3af standard to help the growth of the PoE market with a unified standard              to rely on
  • -          Power Sourcing Equipment (PSE)
  • -          Powered Devices (PD)

 

PoE Details and Variations

  • -          Mode A vs. Mode B
  • -          Mode A: Combining power via Phantom Powering
  • -          Mode B: Power over Ethernet spare pairs

 

Click here to read our PoE white paper.

 

All of our free white papers are available from our website by clicking here.

 

Standards Showdown: 802.11 Standards Side-by-Side

July 20, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

The IEEE is almost always working on another new amendment to the 802.11 Wi-Fi standard. We now have nearly as many 802.11 standards as there are letters in the alphabet, and keeping them straight can get confusing. Fortunately, we’ve compiled a comprehensive list of all of the 802.11 standards, old and new, for easy reference. 

 

White-Space Wi-Fi 802.11af

May 11, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

Waste not, want not, seems to be a growing way of life for many people these days, and that theme will soon apply to the Wi-Fi spectrum as well. The IEEE standard 802.11af, also known as white-space Wi-Fi or White-Fi, will utilize the unused space in the TV spectrum, the TV white-space, to support Wi-Fi networks.

 

How is this possible?

 

Broadcast television coverage is organized to leave a certain amount of space between coverage areas to avoid interference. This results in a significant amount of space where channels are unused. 802.11af allows Wi-Fi applications that require less power to utilize the white-space between coverage areas without causing interference.

 

Why do we need White Space Wi-Fi?

 

The need for more spectrum is greater than ever. 802.11af fulfills this need by allowing wireless networks to take advantage of the white-space in the frequency spectrum. 802.11af provides support for operation in unused TV channels in the VHF and UHF bands, which adds white-space services to 802.11 WLAN devices and builds upon the 802.11ac offerings.

 

What are the benefits?

 

In addition to providing more spectrum for Wi-Fi use, 802.11af allows for long-range and low-power operation because it uses frequencies below 1 GHz. This means it will work more like a traditional Wi-Fi network to increase bandwidth over a long-range wireless local-area network (WLAN).

 

The lowest band used by current Wi-Fi systems is 2.4 GHz. 802.11af operates in the 6, 7 and 8 MHz channels, which makes it backward compatible with existing international TV band allocations.

 

Operation can be arranged for 1-4 channels, either contiguously or in two non-contiguous blocks, allowing devices to collect enough spectrum to achieve high data rates. Plus, there is a possibility that additional unused frequencies can be accessed to add even more capabilities.

 

Here is a chart showing the 802.11af frequencies and corresponding TV white-space channels:

 

 

 

White-space Wi-Fi 802.11af is not going to be the perfect solution for all applications. But it is going take processing technology to another level by providing access to more spectrum to meet today’s ever-growing Wi-Fi needs.

 

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