GigE Vision – A Clear Standard

July 19, 2018 at 8:00 AM

 

As big data has gotten bigger and bigger, so have vision applications. GigE Vision is a global interface standard designed to support the transmission of high-speed video and related control data over Ethernet networks that include GigE, 10 GigE and 802.11 wireless networks.

 

This standard was developed using the Gigabit Ethernet communication protocol and provides fast image transfer using readily available Ethernet cables over extended distances. GigE Vision is capable of fast, high-bandwidth transfers of large images in real time at 125 MB/s and up to 100 meters in length. With the use of standard Cat5e and Cat6 cables and connectors, using GigE Vision is cost effective, highly scalable and allows for simple integration by using existing Ethernet infrastructures.

 

Managed by the AIA, a trade association for the machine vision industry, the GigE Vision standard was introduced in 2006 and has since been adopted globally, with most major industrial video hardware and software vendors having developed products that are GigE Vision-compliant. By following the same standard, products from different vendors are all interoperable. This means frame grabbers, embedded hardware interfaces, cameras, video servers, video receivers control applications and management entities can all work together seamlessly using a common Ethernet platform.

 

Much like USB3 Vision, GigE Vision relies on GenICam, a generic programming interface for different types of cameras, to access and control features in cameras and other imaging devices that are compliant. The simplicity of installation and high performance specs of GigE Vision makes it ideal for industrial applications. The standard is also used in telecom, military, data communications and machine vision applications.

 

GigE Vision is currently at version 2.0, which includes non-streaming device control, faster streaming over 10 Gig Ethernet and link aggregation. Version 2.0 is ideal for multi-camera systems and introduced the Precision Time Protocol (PTP) that enables cameras to be activated at the same time and Trigger-over-Ethernet without the need for an I/O cable. It also allows for multi-camera systems to be precisely synchronized, compressed images to be transmitted and enhanced support for multi-tap sensors. With all of its capabilities and benefits, GigE Vision has proven to be a boon in the world of vision applications.

 

How Tech is Changing Transportation

April 19, 2018 at 8:00 AM

 

These days, it’s hard to find a part of our everyday lives that’s not being transformed in some way by technology. Transportation is no different. Driverless cars have been at the forefront of most transportation technology discussions lately, but do you know other ways that tech is changing how we get from point A to point B? Here, we’ll take a look at some of the ways technology is changing the transportation industry.

 

Rail

 

Railways are one of the oldest forms of transportation still used today. At their inception, trains were a groundbreaking way for people to get back and forth for everyday commutes, to explore places they’d never been and to transport goods at speeds that were unheard of at the time. Rail systems are still used today for many of the same reasons, but they are much smarter. Today’s rail yards have wired and wireless technology that allows for communication throughout the rail yard to provide security, control and real-time data collection.

 

RFID technology has also been put in place to modernize asset management in rail yard operations. Instead of employees walking from one car to another, manually recording inventory, today’s systems use electronic scanners to record asset information accurately and without the variable of human error. This data is then sent back to a central office where assets can be monitored in real time.

 

Technology is also being used to make rail travel safer by using wayside monitoring applications to record real-time data such as speed, time of passing and track conditions. This critical information is used for real-time scheduling and to generate safety alerts.

 

Roadways

 

Until all of those self-driving cars get on the road, and possibly still after, making roadways safer is another way technology is affecting the transportation industry. In tunnels, cellular and Wi-Fi service are provided by antennas while IP cameras connect to an Ethernet network. These cameras provide real time surveillance to a tunnel control center, so traffic and safety concerns can be monitored live. Digital signs are also connected to the Ethernet network, allowing them to be controlled remotely.

 

Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) use wired and wireless technology to control roadway traffic signals and vehicle and pedestrian safety systems. These systems utilize technology to manage traffic flow and ease congestion on the roads. Roadway security and overall safety is also improved with IP cameras and traffic sensors providing live surveillance and control.

 

With the use of wireless technology, roadside digital signs are able to deliver real time messaging along roadways with live updates being delivered from a central control office. These messages can include weather updates, traffic and road condition alerts and information on alternate routes, all of which can make travel easier, more efficient and save lives.

 

Maritime

 

An entire ship, including every part of shipboard communications and surveillance, can be managed via a central management station by using an Ethernet network and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). 

 

IP cameras are used for monitoring, cables connect propulsion and steering systems to a controller, and antennas allow for voice and data communications and RFID management of cargo containers.

 

To load and unload ships, modern seaport terminals use automated crane systems to save freight companies millions of dollars in labor, maintenance and repairs. Computers are housed in a secure location, connected to Ethernet networks and used to control the cranes. This wireless network allows remote control over operations without the cost of running cables.

 

On the dock, keeping track of personnel, assets and ground support vehicles is made easier with wireless communications. Antennas allow for communication with the central operations command center. They also support Intermodal container RFID tracking systems which enable wireless devices to quickly and accurately process container and inventory information in real-time. With cellular and Wi-Fi communication between crews, freight companies can save money and increase security by eliminating the need for traditional radio communications.

 

For an in-depth look at what L-com products are being used to deliver technology to the transportation industry, click here.

 

Benefits of 24 AWG Cable

July 21, 2016 at 8:00 AM

 

When designing your Ethernet network, there are so many cable parameters to consider, including different wire gauges. To help you choose the cable that best suits your Ethernet connectivity application, we’ll take a deeper look at the benefits of 24 AWG cable and all that it has to offer.

 

Longer Distance

If 26 AWG cable was a sprinter, 24 AWG would be a long distance runner. 24 AWG cable can be used for distances of up to 90 meters, before adding a repeater. This is a significantly longer distance in comparison to 26 AWG cables that only support 68 meters.

 

Larger Diameter Conductor

Rugged to the core, the large diameter of a 24 AWG cable makes for a stronger conductor. This added strength is beneficial when the cable is being pulled-on during installation and when routed through machines or other equipment.

 

Lower Attenuation

That large conductor also brings the benefits of lower attenuation. Because the 24 AWG conductor is larger than that of the 26 AWG cable, is has less signal loss over distance.

 

Improved Connection

Improved connection is another benefit of the larger copper conductor of 24 AWG cable. Because the cable has more copper for the pins of an insulation displacement connector (IDC), 

like an RJ45, to “bite” into, it results in better connector retention and durability.

 

PoE Support

Thicker copper in the 24 AWG cable, also results in enhanced Power over Ethernet (PoE) capabilities. Thicker copper = less resistance = longer distances with less heat, all of which equates to better PoE performance.

 

You want to make sure that you have the best, most reliable cable in order for your network to perform optimally and 24 AWG cable has many benefits that set is apart. From Cat6 cable assemblies to Cat5e patch cords, L-com offers a variety of 24 AWG cables to fit your needs.

 

Contact us today for more information.

 

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