IP Ratings for Dummy’s

April 20, 2017 at 8:00 AM

 

Don’t know an IP rating from an IP address? Don’t worry, we’re here to help. First, IP ratings have absolutely nothing to do with IP addresses. In this case, IP stands for ingress protection. Ingress protection (IP) ratings are used to measure a product’s level of protection against liquids and solids - qualities that can be very important for expensive communications equipment, especially when exposed to harsh environments.

 

An IP rating consists of two digits, each with its own meaning. The first number in the rating represents protection from solid objects and particulates such as dust and sand. These numbers range from 0 to 6. A rating of 0 means there is no protection and a 6 means the product is 100% protected.

 

The second digit in the rating signifies how well the part is protected from liquids. These numbers range from 0 to 8 with levels of protection varying from no protection to fully protected even when completely submerged and under pressure.

 

A variety of IP-rated communication system components are available to support a wide range of applications where standard products will not work.  These include IP67 and IP68 cable assemblies, couplers and adapters. Waterproof varieties also include USB, Ethernet, video and fiber optic products designed for unforgiving industrial environments.

 

Here is an example and a chart to illustrate exactly how IP ratings work:

  

 

 

To view all of our IP-rated products for use in extreme conditions, click here.

 

Video Blog- L-com's Toughest Cable Field Test

November 3, 2016 at 8:00 AM

 

Have you ever wanted to test your cables and really push them to the limit? If so, we have a video you MUST watch. We wanted to see just how much abuse our metal armored cables could endure, so we put them through our toughest test ever.

 

Our series of metal armored cables are capable of withstanding the harshest environments and are specifically designed for outdoor, industrial and military applications. Rugged metal armor protects the cable from damage and provides up to 1,500 pounds per square inch (PSI) of crush resistance. The metal jacket also secures the cable from dust, oil, moisture and UV damage. These cables can be used in a variety of industrial applications including factory automation, manufacturing and chemical or petroleum processing networks.

 

Our metal armored cables are currently available off-the-shelf in USB, DVI, HDMI, Ethernet (RJ45) and D-Subminiature styles. Plastic armored cable assemblies with up to 800 PSI of crush resistance are also available. In addition to our extensive off-the-shelf armored cable offering, we can also design and manufacture armored cables to your specifications.

 

Now, check out the video to watch our field test and see just how tough our armored cables are.

 

 

For more videos, tips and tutorials, click here.

 

NEMA Enclosures: Best Fit Guide

July 7, 2016 at 8:00 AM

 

With so much relying on your network being fully functional, a NEMA enclosure is one of the best ways to safe-guard your valuable equipment. NEMA enclosures are ideal for wired and wireless networks to protect critical equipment from the elements, chemicals, physical contact, theft and damage. They are designed to endure all types of abuse and keep enclosed, sensitive electronics safe.

 

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) rates enclosures based on criteria that includes resistance to dust, moisture, water immersion and ice. The better the rating, the more the enclosure can withstand.

 

Here, we guide you through the most popular enclosure features to help find the best fit to protect your valuable equipment.


Industrial

Most enclosures are labeled as “industrial” because they are built to be rugged and protect against the elements and feature options such as heating and cooling. They are made for indoor and outdoor use in hot and cold environments.


Weatherproof

When your equipment is located outside or in an industrial setting, such as a factory or processing plant, a weatherproof NEMA enclosure provides the insurance you need. They protect against damage from environmental hazards such as water, dust, oil and corrosive chemicals like gasoline.


Non- Powered

These protective enclosures are perfect for wired and wireless communications equipment that do not require power. L-com’s non-powered enclosures feature fully gasketed lids to ensure optimal performance. Our non-powered enclosures are also available in a variety of rugged materials including Molded Fiberglass Reinforced Polyester (FRP) and VALOX 357U thermoplastic material.

 

Powered

For equipment that requires a power source, a powered NEMA enclosure will be your best bet. They share many of the same attributes as their non-powered counterparts but can be built with power outlets for various interfaces including 12V DC, 120V AC, 240V AC and POE. Some powered enclosures also include built-in lightning protection for an extra level of security.

 

Heating and Cooling

If your equipment will be exposed to cold temperatures, extreme heat or moisture, you may want a NEMA enclosure that provides cooling, heat or ventilation. For example, L-com offers an enclosure that is ideal for keeping equipment warm and functional in sub-zero temperatures as low as -30°F (-34°C). This particular model features a thermostat-controlled heating system that is powered by a Cat5 cable and is shielded by foam insulation and fiberglass.

 

NEMA enclosures provide plenty of options that can be mixed and matched to make sure your network equipment is protected. For more information on which options will be the best fit, or to have us design a custom enclosure for you, contact us today.

 

Tips on Selecting an Ethernet Media Converter

January 9, 2014 at 10:00 AM


L-com Industrial Ethernet Media Converter (DIN Rail mounting)

Fiber optic technology is taking the Ethernet networking world by storm. It is faster, completely resistant to EMI/RFI, and offers incredible distances between nodes.

 

But fiber is not quite ready for all LAN applications. In many cases it makes sense to keep a copper network intact and lay a fiber network over it. So, here we find a need in our industry for a device that will convert seamlessly between the fiber optic network and the copper network without loss of speed.

 

We call these devices Ethernet media converters.

 

 

Industrial vs. Commercial

 

Commercial Media Converters

The first consideration in finding the proper converter for your application is whether your Ethernet media converter will be installed in a commercial or industrial environment. A commercial environment would include a typical office or clean room, and an industrial environment includes places with dust, moisture, temperature variations, vibrations, and other complications.

 

We've gone over the differences between the two in regards to switches before, but the same rules apply for media converters. It is very important not to confuse industrial versus commercial converters. While an industrial Ethernet media converter can operate in a commercial environment, it costs more and generally supports features not commonly found in a commercial environment such as DC power. On the other hand, a commercial Ethernet media converter should not be used in an industrial environment as network downtime and system failure can occur.

 


Single mode vs. Multimode

 

Fiber Glass Types

There are two main "modes" for fiber optic cabling: single mode and multimode. L-com has a great tutorial and video with in-depth explanation. In general, a single mode system is more expensive, but also provides better signal strength over large distances (up to 100km or more).

 

Multimode is much more affordable and can be used in distances of up to 2km, depending on network speed and bandwidth. Again, don't confuse the two! If you are running multimode cable, you need a multimode Ethernet media converter; a single mode version will not work.

 


Fiber Optic Connector Types

 

 

Fiber optic cables have their own unique connector types. There's a good video explaining fiber connectors here. Unlike copper, fiber connectors are very difficult to install properly in the field, and there aren't many options for converting a connector type with a passive adapter (although L-com does carry ST-SC, ST-FC and LC-SC adapters, among others, on its fiber optic adapters page). It is best to match the connector type with the device so they can be easily connected and no extra loss is incurred.

 

Remember, L-com stocks hundreds of factory terminated fiber optic cables off-the-shelf. We can custom manufacture fiber cables without minimum order quantities and with very short lead times, so you don't need to re-terminate or adapt a mismatched cable.

 

 

Other Features

 

Before ordering your media converter, also consider things like mounting method (DIN rails, 19" racks or chassis, or just placed on a shelf), network speed (10/100/1000 Mbps), and how you will get power to the unit. A properly installed media converter can both future-proof and provide redundancy for your network for years to come!

 

Quick note: Installing Ethernet media converters may require other components as well, such as fiber optic cables, Ethernet cables, and racks and accessories.
 

Understanding Copper/Fiber Media Converters

August 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM

What is a Media Converter?

 

Diagram of fiber optic premise wiring converted to copper with media converters

A media converter is used to extend Cat 5e/6 Ethernet cabling to distances beyond the 100 meter maximum for Ethernet by converting IP voice/video/data signals to fiber optic cabling.

 

Where are Media Converters used?

 

Media converters are used in environments where EMI/RFI is present, such as manufacturing facilities and other industrial environments. Other applications include campus networks where many buildings need to be connected via fiber. Also, high-rise buildings typically use a fiber backbone, which is laid vertically and taps into copper (UTP) networks on each floor via a media converter.

 

L-com's Media Converter offering

 

L-com offers media converters designed for both commercial and industrial use.

 

Commercial-grade fiber-to-copper media converters from L-com

 

L-com Ethernet Media Converter 10/100TX to 100FX MM SC 2km

- Plug-and-play installation
- Rugged metal case ensure longevity
- Multimode and Single-mode versions available
- Easy-to-read LEDs provide at-a-glance system status information
- Operating temp: 0°C to +70°C 

 

Industrial DIN Rail Media Converters from L-com

 

LCMC Media Converters

- 35mm DIN rail mounting
- Rugged aluminum case
- 24V DC power input
- Plug and play
- Operating temp: -40°C to +70°C

 

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