DisplayPort 2.0 - Just the Facts

August 22, 2019 at 8:00 AM

 

HDMI might be the most popular connection standard for TVs and monitors, but DisplayPort comes in a close second place. This high quality alternative is similar to HDMI in many ways including smaller connectors, digital video, audio/video on one cable, high definition video, 3D capabilities, etc. It has most of the same features of HDMI, plus some capabilities that are important for the high-graphic demands of business applications. And now, DisplayPort is getting an upgrade to DisplayPort 2.0! Let’s look at the facts.

 

DisplayPort 2.0 is slated to launch next year with products incorporating the technology hitting the market in late 2020. This new iteration takes the connection standard into the next generation with triple the bandwidth compared to DisplayPort 1.4a. DisplayPort 2.0 will deliver faster refresh rates and be able to single stream higher resolution formats like 10K and 16K at 60Hz at up to 30 bits per pixel with HDR. For smaller formats, it will also be capable of multiple displays at higher resolutions including two 8K at 120 Hz with 30 bpp and HDR, or two 4K displays at 144 Hz at 24 bpp with no compression.

 

In addition to bandwidth and high-resolution upgrades, DisplayPort 2.0 has some other improvements including Panel Replay which reduces power requirements while enhancing how a display is refreshed. Display Stream Compression (DSC) will be standard and allows for extremely high refresh rates and high-resolution. Plus, a multi-stream transport feature will make for easier daisy chain displays.

 

When it comes to the connectors, DisplayPort 2.0 will be backwards compatible with previous versions. It can be used in “DP Alt Mode” using specific USB-C connectors, allowing for one cable to provide high-speed video & data with optimal performance. The physical interface layer of Thunderbolt 3 is also utilized in this new standard, which will be especially appealing with a merger between Thunderbolt 3 & USB 4 in the works.

 

When it comes to connectivity, HDMI might be the most widely recognized medium, but DisplayPort 2.0 is coming in hot with lots of features that make it a very attractive option. And luckily, L-com has a full line of DisplayPort cables for all of your needs.

 

Engineers’ Choice

October 13, 2016 at 8:00 AM

 

We depend on our engineers for their innovative ideas. We asked them what topic, technology or trend they thought we should feature in this weeks post. Our engineers’ choice: USB Type-C connectors. Here is an inside look at the connectors that got our enigneers’ stamp of approval.

 

We all love using USB. The plug-and-play interface makes it easy to connect and charge our devices. But it can be aggravating to figure out which USB cord goes with which device, and then which end plugs in where. Forutnately, our prayers have been answered and the technology gods have given us Type-C connectors.

 

USB Type-C is a tiny connector that boasts fast speeds, more power handling capabilities and a simpler, sleeker design.

 

The smaller, slimmer USB Type-C is a single connnector that can be used on all devices. Designed to replace both full-sized USB connectors as well as micro-USB connectors, it is tailored to fit mobile devices, yet powerful enough to be used with laptops and tablets. Whether you’re connecting an external peripheral to your laptop or charging your smartphone, Type-C connectors provide one cable small enough and powerful enough to do it all.

 

The Type-C connector has a simple, reversible design that makes using USB easier than ever. Completely reversible plug orientation and cable direction eliminate the guess work and frustration of not knowing which end is up when plugging in your USB devices.

 

Made for SUPERSPEED+ USB 3.1, Type-C connectors boast lightning speeds of up to 10 Gbps. They also support a vareity of different protocols that, with an adapter, allow output of HDMI, VGA, DisplayPort and other types of technologies from a single USB port. Type-C connectors are designed to provide scalable power and performance to adapt to whatever your future needs may be.

 

Type-C connectors are also made to support  USB Power Delivery (PD). Currently, a USB 2.0 connection provides up to 2.5 Watts of power, that’s enough to charge your phone, but not your laptop. With USB PD, the power delivery is increased to up to 100 Watts, and the power is bi-directional so it can be sent or received. That means that as long as the device and cable support USB PD, you can use a Type-C connector to charge devices from one another and possibly eliminate the need for a separate laptop charging cord.

 

Though USB technology is backward compatible, Type-C connectors are not, so we will continue to see devices and cords with both Type-A and Type-C connectors. Type-C connectors have been integrated into an increasing number of devices over the past year, they are now found on Google’s Chromebook Pixel and Apple’s MacBook and in the furture they may even replace Lightning connectors on iPads and iPhones.

 

For more information on Type-C connectors and USB 3.1, check out our blog post USB 3.1 – Fasten Your Seatbelts

 

DisplayPort Connectivity Primer: What You Need To Know

October 20, 2013 at 8:45 AM

 

You may wonder why there’s a need for DisplayPort when HDMI® is as ubiquitous as it is, and with all of its capabilities above traditional analog video.

 

Well, DisplayPort is similar to HDMI® in a lot of ways: smaller connectors, digital video, audio/video on one cable, high definition video, 3D capabilities, etc. For most consumers, especially in the home theater market, if they plug it in and get a display on the screen then it works! And little else matters. As you'll see, however, not all audio/video applications are the same.

 

DisplayPort wasn't necessarily developed to improve on HDMI®, so when we compare HDMI® to DisplayPort, we're not saying it should be either/or. Instead, we're saying before you assume all the personnel in your business need HDMI®-only video cards and laptops, consider taking a look at DisplayPort's capabilities.

 Close Up View of DisplayPort Connector

HDMI® vs. DisplayPort

 

 

HDMI® is in many ways the successor to DVI, which was in many ways the bridge between analog video like VGA and digital video. Improving on DVI, HDMI® includes audio with the video in one cable, does away with the screw locks, and can provide up to 1080p HD video which is necessary for most of the latest TVs used in home theater applications. That's really what HDMI® was developed for and it does a great job.

 

DisplayPort was developed by VESA (Video Electronics Standards Association) as a standard for higher resolution computer display devices. It has most of the features of HDMI® plus some capabilities that are important for the high-graphic demands of some business applications.


Among the top benefits of DisplayPort are:

 

1. Unlike HDMI®, which does not support a very good refresh rate at the higher resolutions, DisplayPort maxes out at 3840 x 2160 pixels with a refresh rate of 60Hz, allowing it to handle very demanding video and 3D applications.


2. The DisplayPort standard can support multiple monitors (up to 4) with a single card, each receiving independent audio/video streams. This is important for individuals working on high resolution graphics, but needing more than one screen to handle the different tool bars or multiple applications running at the same time. In some cases, monitors may be "daisy chained" together, simplifying the setup.


3. DisplayPort has some other minor benefits such as longer cable lengths and a latching feature that makes them more secure in vibration applications than HDMI®'s friction fit connectors.Engineering Drawing of a DisplayPort Connector Calling Out Latches

4. Though DisplayPort is nowhere near as common as HDMI® for peripherals, that is changing. For instance, Thunderbolt, the standard developed by Intel based on the DisplayPort standard, is present on nearly all of Apple's MacBooks and other laptops and computers. Manufacturers of peripherals to be used on MacBooks and elsewhere are designing in either Thunderbolt or Mini DisplayPort to comply.

 

HDMI® isn't going away. Nor should it! It works great for the vast majority of applications. However, there are several applications that will benefit from DisplayPort. In time the technology for DisplayPort will probably be as relevant for those applications as HDMI® is for home theater.

 

 

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