Industrial Wireless Network Design: Finding the Right Frequency

June 12, 2014 at 10:00 AM

 

 

 

Surely you will enjoy this informational write up if you consider yourself aligned with any of the following:

 

A- You’ll soon be involved in an industrial wireless network deployment.


B- You like to learn about wireless network systems.

 

Or, C- You’re a fan of our blog and REALLY like to read our stuff.

 

Oh stop, you’re making me blush. 

 

 

Where were we? 

 

Right. We’re here to talk about the fact that today’s industrial wireless networks utilize multiple frequency ranges to address different applications. 

 

Within just one industrial setting, you might find two or even three frequencies in play because of their unique characteristics.

 

For instance, just about every industrial installation requires security systems with cameras to protect against intruders and potential saboteurs. 

 

Today’s industrial camera networks typically utilize a specific type of camera, called IP cameras. These are sometimes wired using Cat5e/6 cabling, though often they are connected via wireless links (due to issues such as remote placement where cables cannot be easily run). 

 

These wireless IP camera networks require higher bandwidth to send video and/or audio communications to a central control office. Therefore, 2.4 GHz WiFi networks are often used. By implementing 802.11g or 802.11n systems, wireless speeds of 54 Mbps up to 150 Mbps can be realized. 

 

Here are a few products that can be used in a 2.4 GHz WiFi industrial network:

 

 

2.4 GHz Antennas          2.4 GHz Outdoor Access Point       2.4 GHz Amplifiers     2.4 GHz Filters/Splitters

 

 

2.4 GHz Antennas

2.4 GHz Outdoor CPE

2.4 GHz Amplifiers

2.4 GHz Filters/Splitters

 
 

In contrast, other facilities such as oil and chemical processing plants, wastewater treatment plants and manufacturing operations may have wireless communications systems that require relatively lower bandwidth communications.

 

This is because simpler tasks such as opening a valve or taking pressure and temperature readings from a tank require less bandwidth.

 

In this case, the 400 MHz and 900 MHz frequency bands are often used. When compared to 2.4 GHz and even 5.8 GHZ frequencies, the 900 MHZ ISM frequency band also supports longer, more reliable distance reach and penetration of obstructions (such as trees and leaves) when faced with Near Line of Sight (nLOS) and Non Line of Sight (NLOS) conditions. This is advantageous when connecting long distance, remote monitoring or process facilities is required.

 

Below are examples of 400 MHz and 900 MHz products that one might use in an industrial setting: 

 

 

400 MHz Antennas            900 MHz Antennas         900 MHz Amplifiers            900 MHz Splitters/Filters

 

 

400 MHz Antennas

900 MHz Antennas

900 MHz Amplifiers

900 MHz Splitters/Filters

 

In addition to the products we’ve already mentioned for use within industrial networks, L-com also carries lightning and surge protectors, low loss coaxial and category rated cabling, weatherproof NEMA enclosures and more to address industrial networking applications.


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